Bose S1 Pro Speaker came in

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Jeff Romard

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#41
Bluetooth can certainly be hacked by a person in a crowd - the newest version (5.0 @ 50mbps) has been recently hacked.

FYI - Bluetooth speeds:

5.0 - 50 mbps limited to 240 meters
4.0 - 25 mbps limited to 60 meters
3.0 - 25 mbps limited to 10 meters

For multiple connections, there may be apps that allow you to connect multiple devices instead of bluetooth.

'The research I just did is that JBL bluetooth speakers has that feature on there speakers where it allows it connect multiple speakers at once from one device (it could be a app too, not sure). A few of there bluetooth speakers (mainly the ones with the + at the end) come with this feature. Hope this helps, probably the only thing that doesn't help is that there quite expensive'

I'm also seeing that the Apple Mac (El Capitan and up) can natively connect to multiple sound devices via Bluetooth. I think Bluetooth still has a long ways to go before its anywhere near reliable (and secure).
Is it only the new version that can be hacked?
 

steve149

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Sep 26, 2011
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#42
Most BT hardware devices require someone to press a button on the device, so the likelihood is small if you keep an eye on your gear. For remote speakers, it certainly could be an issue. But people can hack wireless mics too with an appropriate transmitter.
 

Jeff Romard

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#44
No, the newest one is the most secured of them all - but not anymore. The others were easier / quicker to hack.
I thought when I asked a few months back that it was next to impossible. I'm paranoid again lol
 
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steve149

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#45
Almost anything is hackable .. someone hacks a BT unit, you reset it, make an announcement you'll give $20 to the first person who identifies the creep ...
 

ittigger

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Feb 1, 2011
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#48
What are they going to get hacking a BT speaker?
Like most hackers, they're not really after anything - it's the challenge to do it. Maybe it's to interrupt your connection. Maybe play their own style of music. Maybe they could link into the host device - where all the information is.
 
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ittigger

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#49
Bluetooth security tips (example addresses phones specifically but these tips should be followed for ALL bluetooth devices):

If your phone is sleeping and locked, an attacker can still connect. As soon as they attempt to access your stuff or get tricky and try to take control, the screen would light up - if it's unlocked or you have no password / security, then you've helped them bypass this step. If you have it setup with security (pin, print, etc), then you are safe, at least for now. Don't think for a minute that people aren't working on a way around this because they are - and they will find it.

* Shut Bluetooth off when you're not using it. You're 'probably' safe at home or at work, but if you get into the habit of turning Bluetooth off when you don't need it you won't forget the next time you go to Starbucks. There is no way for an attacker to turn Bluetooth on. At least not yet.

* Make sure you have a secure lock screen. If you don't already have a password, PIN, pattern, fingerprints or anything else set up so your phone is locked until you unlock it yourself, go do it now.

* Turn off trusted devices while you're at it. Tapping in a 4-digit PIN or scanning your eyeballs is way more convenient than getting new credit cards and talking to your bank, even once. Trust me, I've been there. (Thanks, Target. Idiots, I swear.)

* Don't leave your phone unattended. Put it in your pocket or purse and take it with you even if you're only stepping away for a minute or two.

* If you see the screen turn on, look and see why. This is the biggest "flaw" in the hack - it will turn your screen on if someone tries to do anything after they are connected.

There probably isn't an army of people patrolling the streets, ready to hack "all the phones/devices" through Bluetooth. But there could be that one guy, and he could be anywhere (McDonald's, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, the library, literally anywhere). In cases like this, it's always better to be safe because the things hackers can do are pretty easy - as are the things we can do to help protect our stuff. Your stuff is worth protecting.

As noted, the latest version of Bluetooth, version 5.0 is rated at 50 mbps limited to 240 meters but the signal gets crappy at about 30'. A Bluetooth hacker attacks the Bluetooth protocol - the device they're looking to hack into may or may not matter much.
 
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Cap Capello

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#51
I'm doing a church related Mardi Gras event tomorrow night in our parish hall. Expecting about 100.

I'm going with a pair of S1 on tripods. I'll have a pair of F1-812 on standby but I really think they will work out (not a big dancing group so why not try them?)

I'll try to grab some video.
 

Scott Hanna

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Oct 25, 2006
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#52
I dunt know if I'll ever use Bluetooth at an event. But I'm not really worried about someone hacking it.

I remember people being scared that getting battery powered lights would just encourage people to steal them. Hasn't happened. Of course, we all need to be aware of our surroundings and who is there.

It would have been nice to connect more than one via Bluetooth in case I ever decide to use it. I have a pair of Altos that can do that. But it's not a big deal.
 

Jeff Romard

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#53
I dunt know if I'll ever use Bluetooth at an event. But I'm not really worried about someone hacking it.

I remember people being scared that getting battery powered lights would just encourage people to steal them. Hasn't happened. Of course, we all need to be aware of our surroundings and who is there.

It would have been nice to connect more than one via Bluetooth in case I ever decide to use it. I have a pair of Altos that can do that. But it's not a big deal.
I would guess that most wouldn't notice wireless or bluetooth we tend to worry about more than we should sometimes
 

ittigger

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#54
You're right, most people wouldn't - but hackers are not most people. One of my hats is a security professional. You'd be surprised how many flaws you can find if you know what you're looking for - and alot of them, you the general user can find. Some of you are the cause - and can easily fix the issues. Some of you 'really don't care' and imo, that's the wrong attitude to have - because we're also the guys you call when it's too late and the damage is done.

You might be surprised to know how simple the Target breach actually was - and how much damage that 'simple' thing caused.
 
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Cap Capello

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#55
Steve posted an add-on device for bluetooth multi-drops for around $99.00 for a set of two with potential for more solo pieces. I think I'm going that route because I'm a STEREO FREAQ!

In terms of hackers, I doubt one of my performances would be worth a hackers time and energy. As in other forms of terrorism threats, I refuse to become overly concerned nor cave in to fear, however in my profiling (I can do that now that I'm not law enforcement any more) of my audiences, I will pay closer scrutiny to any nerdy looking folks.
 

steve149

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#58

azdeejay

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#59