A trend - Could be good or bad for DJs


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Nov 10, 2006
77
101
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55
Ventura County, CA
#1
I have been using Spotify for a a few years now and love it. I build up lots of playlists in different genres and then put them on shuffle mode when I am in the mood for that genre. Shuffle mode prevents the playlist from seeming repetitive as many of my lists are longer than the typical coast-to-coast flight. Spotify does a great job of cross-fading and leveling the tracks. It is even better than VDJ or MediaMonkey at this.

The more genres I add, the more I find I can use Spotify. Heck, as my father was on his death bed a couple of weeks ago, I started playing him big band and classical music (his favorite genres) from my phone and it seemed to calm him down. My GF always brings her BT speaker (fits in her purse) with her whenever we visit friends for cocktails because some never think of playing music and we always listen to music. No one has ever asked us to bring music but very time we have done this people profusely thank us for it. Over the next few weeks, we have been invited to numerous holiday cocktail/dinner parties with friends and of course, the BT speaker is coming with us.

This trend has me thinking this could be good and bad for the DJ industry.

Good: People are seeing how much better their own small events are with music. If they are planning bigger events, they may hire a DJ.

Bad: People are seeing how easy it is to just create a playlist and use a BT speaker to enhance a party and thus think they can forego a DJ at their next event.

It is hard to say at this point which will have a bigger impact.

Only once did we try to dance at a friends house to music from a BT speaker. We had fun but only because it wasn't a dance party. I discovered that every time someone used an iPhone to take a picture, it sent a pause command via BT to Spotify playing my phone. That was very random but quite consistent. Also, Spotify often has multiple versions of a song that are NOT the one you are used to. Finally, instead of taking requests, people just try to connect to the speaker directly and play the song from their phone. That gets really awkward when 4 people are doing this. At least we are all still friends. Maybe I should start a thread about the downsides of BT.
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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#2
The dj's that actually mix and manipulate the music will always stand out from these services. Spotify and the likes will never know when to cut a song short and mix in and out based on the crowds engagement with the song is, or know how to read a crowd to say or mix something in that very moment. It will also never be able to fully personalize a night for the couple, as often some couples are looking for certain songs to be back to back. This service for me personally isn't a threat in any way as it can't come close to replicating what I do. For the dj's that don't mix, and don't do anything unique or creative musically, especially not properly mixing... they'll be the first to slowly be overlooked by couples looking to save money. One can argue that this option doesn't handle formalities or provide interactive MC skills, but that didn't deter ipod weddings years ago, so if anything this will further increase the amount of DIY style couples.
 

rickryan.com

DJ Extraordinaire
Dec 9, 2009
15,097
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www.RickRyan.com
#3
Is the glass half-empty or half-full?

Yes, if you see yourself as a "music specialist" (i.e. Don't want to offer add-ons) then things like spotify are going to continue eating your lunch. Those services, my opinion, are getting really good and can easily replace a non-MC DJ, fairly easily. I regularly recommend this over a bottom-feeder DJ, whenever they don't have budget for a decent person.

Now if you'll look at the flip side, this could work in our favor. As people become more accustomed to having music at every event, it's going to become more of an expectation. Also, higher level events will view a live DJ over spotify as something they want to be able to give their guests. Nobody wants to be seen as throwing the cheapest party possible, they want to be seen as throwing the best party of the year.

As a business person, this simply underlines how important it is for me to be ever expanding and re-inventing what I do.
 
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DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
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#4
The dj's that actually mix and manipulate the music will always stand out from these services. Spotify and the likes will never know when to cut a song short and mix in and out based on the crowds engagement with the song is, or know how to read a crowd to say or mix something in that very moment. It will also never be able to fully personalize a night for the couple, as often some couples are looking for certain songs to be back to back. This service for me personally isn't a threat in any way as it can't come close to replicating what I do. For the dj's that don't mix, and don't do anything unique or creative musically, especially not properly mixing... they'll be the first to slowly be overlooked by couples looking to save money. One can argue that this option doesn't handle formalities or provide interactive MC skills, but that didn't deter ipod weddings years ago, so if anything this will further increase the amount of DIY style couples.
Never say NEVER!

How do you or I or anyone else know without a doubt that all of this COULD be done by a Robot or Machine that utilizes A.I. ?

Starting out, it will take a company providing this with human labor to set it all up, but even the human labor could be replaced by machines in the far future.

If they can create self driving trucks, and cars, I am sure they could create robot DJs in the coming years. ...Even a robot photographer will be possible.

Maybe not in the next 10 years, but 20 to 30 years down the road this could certainly be a reality for us. DJs who plan to retire from being a DJ in the next 10 years won't care about this, but DJs who are 20+ years from retirement realistically might possibly witness this sort of change in our industry.
 

wifedj

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 20, 2008
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#5
If your self aware skill and level of service is equivalent to a Spotify playlist, your anecdotal post would be of real concern.

If, however, your realized and compensated value is greater than a DIY playlist from an anyone can join for free music service, than you story is merely and only slightly interesting to read.
 
Likes: djcrazychris

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
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#6
According to my very current face book polls done locally. Only about 15% of people say they would only be willing to DIY the music for their wedding or party.

Most people are still willing to pay for a DJ. It's just that a bit more than half of them would only be willing to pay $400 or less for a party. Take with that what you will, but technological advances has certainly made it harder for DJs to charge more, and be valued at what they do.

Unless you are a DJ that is very good at capturing the high end market in coming years, OR you are a low price value DJ that is great at booking low budget clients, then you will probably notice less and less bookings moving forward as less clientele are finding a good value in DJs who operate between the 2 markets.
 

DJKLEEN

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 31, 2016
584
587
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52
Lafayette la
#7
You can be sure that changes will come in EVERY industry. A good businessman stays ahead of these changes, wheather if is changes in mindset, content, or PRICING. More and more people that have payed for my services, have bought there own equipment! It is getting cheaper and easier to emulate our services.

We as professional dj’s know that they will never match our levels, but to some people “ it is close enough” especially if you are a dj that believes in bringing the bare minimum.
 

steve149

Urbane Legend
Sep 26, 2011
21,143
30,142
115
Prospect, CT
#8
There WILL BE artificially intelligent devices that will be able to read a room and play appropriate music .. mixing it masterfully .. time is the only unknown (and I'm thinking 5-10 years and not decades).

Whether it will be what clients want .. who knows. In clubs, they might even be a draw .. can't be worse than Paris Hilton's attempts.
 

adj2ent

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 20, 2006
530
861
95
58
Long Island NY
#9
Oh, boy you know they have had ways to play music at events before DJ actually started doing parties. For some people they still use those ways. Yes, these new services do make playing music easier or them but it all depends on what you bring to the table as a DJ and what the client wants, expects & has to spend. Music selection/timing, mixing & your personality are some of things you might have to offer your client. I know I do plenty of events were just personality & music selection is the major reason for me being there. They could have easily used Pandora, Apple Music or something else. But it would not have the same impact.

Now, Rick regarding your polls your response rate at best was less than 1% based how many you sent the poll to. The only reliable information is on those who responded, not on the majority who didn’t. A less than 1% rate is like try trying to predict information on 100 people when the very first person didn’t finish filling out the survey. What will always be true, there will alway be majority on the lower with the amount the decreasing as you go up the pay scale.
 
Likes: wifedj

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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#10
As technology gets better and better, a segment of the industry will become less and less “needed”. In the past iPod weddings gained attention and they didn’t even transition songs and your access to music was limited to what you owned. Now with Spotify you get transitions and access to a lot more music than what is in your personal library.

I’m just saying that depending on what you offer and what your skill range is, will determine how much this affects you now and in the future as the technology gets better. It happens in every industry. Look at accounting.l and how software has hurt many generic accounting firms whose majority of the customers were simple w-2’s. However the accountants that handle large scale businesses or individuals with lots of itemized deductions and multiple sources of income haven’t been affected by much at all yet.
 

wifedj

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 20, 2008
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#11
McDonalds sells an estimates 2,365,200,000 hamburgers annually.

Do You think Gene & Georgetti's in Chicago plans to adjust their quality & service to get some of that fast "food" market?
 
Nov 10, 2006
77
101
35
55
Ventura County, CA
#12
Technology innovations are generally more indicative of human laziness than ingenuity. Face it, finding a good DJ is not easy. If it was, there would be no room for bottom feeders.

There are many social events that do not feature dancing or even music. Spotify (and competitors or future developments in AI DJ programs) are an easier and less risky alternative than hiring some low priced DJ and most importantly, easier to find and cheaper. This means more non-dancing events will have music and expectations of having music will rise. Larger events will need bigger speakers and hence more work for DJs.

The flip side is that crappy bottom feeders outnumber pros. A Spotify playlist may be a much better solution for the money. If this becomes acceptable, it could mean less work for pros. A wide music selection was once a reason to hire DJs. That need has now disappeared. It may not be legal to use Spotify for public performance but who is policing it?
 

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
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#13
I'm doing a holiday party and have some down time while everyone eats dinner...so here I am on ODJT...lol

In 1 of my polls a lady commented that She used spotify on her laptop, and connected it to a couple of speakers that she rented for $99 from Guitar Center ...Probably the QSC K12 speakers that they advertise for that price. Obviously, she had to go to store, pay, pick them up along with the stands, cables, and mixer, and the staff told her how to connect her phone or laptop, but she said it worked out fine for her party. It's all in what the customer expects.

Tonight I had a comment from the banquet manager that my lighted table top facade looked nice! I asked if he has seen other DJs bring something like this before. He said some have brought something similar, but not the same. He mentioned that most do not. ...This is a Country Club. And here at least, most DJs who come here are doing things old school likely. ...They set up their gear, don't pay a lot of attention to visual presentation etc.


Now, if I go back to the DJ Expo in 2014 in Atlantic City, I remember a few of the DJs at the time saying a lot of advancements will come out in our industry over the next 5 years. I remember Drax saying this specifically.

Well we are now 4.5 years later.

What has really changed in that time?

We are still using DJ programs and Laptops generally speaking. More advancements in phone tech.

Flat screen TVs are now even cheaper than back then...especially OLED. But to me, it seems less events are bringing in the big screen TVs compared to back in 2014. Maybe I'm wrong on that? Music Videos at events seem to be in decline compared to back then as well.

Powered speakers have become cheaper. There are more Line Array Options out now than 4.5 years ago. Wireless LED Up Lights is now in demand and the big thing. It was around in 2014, but much more expensive, and less options available on that front.

More DJs seem to be using Truss and Moving Head lights compared to in 2014, but it is not "the norm" yet for that, and I dunno if it ever will be utilized by most DJs probably because of budget constraints at the events or being too much gear for solo ops in many situations.

Battery Powered blue tooth speakers are more popular now...They did not quote hit out market yet in 2014.

There are more powered speaker options today than in 2014. The lower end speakers are able to do more, and produce more power at lower prices than in 2014. Not much has changed with the higher end gear though except more Line Array options, and maybe menu screens on the back of speakers (K12.2 as an example).

Outside of more accessible music streaming online, what else has changed for us DJs over 5 years? :shrug:


It also seems that the OLD Multi Op DJs who seemed to be in charge of things at the Expo have mostly disappeared over the past 5 years. I did not see them at the last expo anyway. Maybe the guys that have been around and in the sport light since the 80s and 90s are really taking a back seat, or retiring from Mobile DJ all together?

What other changes have occurred in the last 5 years that I am missing?
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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#14
I'm doing a holiday party and have some down time while everyone eats dinner...so here I am on ODJT...lol

In 1 of my polls a lady commented that She used spotify on her laptop, and connected it to a couple of speakers that she rented for $99 from Guitar Center ...Probably the QSC K12 speakers that they advertise for that price. Obviously, she had to go to store, pay, pick them up along with the stands, cables, and mixer, and the staff told her how to connect her phone or laptop, but she said it worked out fine for her party. It's all in what the customer expects.

Tonight I had a comment from the banquet manager that my lighted table top facade looked nice! I asked if he has seen other DJs bring something like this before. He said some have brought something similar, but not the same. He mentioned that most do not. ...This is a Country Club. And here at least, most DJs who come here are doing things old school likely. ...They set up their gear, don't pay a lot of attention to visual presentation etc.


Now, if I go back to the DJ Expo in 2014 in Atlantic City, I remember a few of the DJs at the time saying a lot of advancements will come out in our industry over the next 5 years. I remember Drax saying this specifically.

Well we are now 4.5 years later.

What has really changed in that time?

We are still using DJ programs and Laptops generally speaking. More advancements in phone tech.

Flat screen TVs are now even cheaper than back then...especially OLED. But to me, it seems less events are bringing in the big screen TVs compared to back in 2014. Maybe I'm wrong on that? Music Videos at events seem to be in decline compared to back then as well.

Powered speakers have become cheaper. There are more Line Array Options out now than 4.5 years ago. Wireless LED Up Lights is now in demand and the big thing. It was around in 2014, but much more expensive, and less options available on that front.

More DJs seem to be using Truss and Moving Head lights compared to in 2014, but it is not "the norm" yet for that, and I dunno if it ever will be utilized by most DJs probably because of budget constraints at the events or being too much gear for solo ops in many situations.

Battery Powered blue tooth speakers are more popular now...They did not quote hit out market yet in 2014.

There are more powered speaker options today than in 2014. The lower end speakers are able to do more, and produce more power at lower prices than in 2014. Not much has changed with the higher end gear though except more Line Array options, and maybe menu screens on the back of speakers (K12.2 as an example).

Outside of more accessible music streaming online, what else has changed for us DJs over 5 years? :shrug:


It also seems that the OLD Multi Op DJs who seemed to be in charge of things at the Expo have mostly disappeared over the past 5 years. I did not see them at the last expo anyway. Maybe the guys that have been around and in the sport light since the 80s and 90s are really taking a back seat, or retiring from Mobile DJ all together?

What other changes have occurred in the last 5 years that I am missing?
I think there have been MASSIVE changes in the last 4 yrs... at least for my area. Here's what I've noticed:
- 2 moving heads on trussing are practically the norm now.
- clients I've noticed know the difference between automated lights that go randomly to the music, and lights that are computer controlled with a light tech. I've been asked about this a number of times this year specifically due to bad experiences from friends who thought they were getting "intelligent" lighting, only to discover it was going crazy during a first dance or the uplights were flashing like crazy and didn't match the atmosphere.
- clients want a dj that provides many options/enhancements... it doesn't mean they want to book a lot of options, but they want a dj with that ability in case they have interest in something later on.
- dancing on clouds and sparklers are picking up in popularity.
- photo booths are VERY popular... but moreso the ones with cool features such as text messaging, video/gif/boomerang modes, mirror booths, and quality props. Also people are paying mroe attention to the quality of the images that print.
- clients are looking online for input on music more than ever... user generated spotify lists... covers of songs not available online except youtube... etc etc.
- couples are also asking for songs to be cut quicker, and for a dj to have the ability to mix in a large variety of music more than in the past.
- clients are searching online more than ever, and expecting pricing to be listed more than ever (recent weddingwire report that came out yesterday also stated this)
- clients care very much about the dj's set up now. The top 10% of dj's in my area have all started a shift to podium style booths or a custom booth of some sort... facades are phasing out slowly where applicable.
- Clients expect some sort of online portal now for planning. After hearing more and more that their friends did things online... they expect the same convenience
- while multi ops may be fading in some areas, they are still popular here... and most single ops have a hard time breaking through. The common question with single ops I get and others mention is do we have someone on site that can take over in case of an issue. I personally always bring an assistant dj to every event that can take over, but many I know are one man shows.
- less in person meetings, more video chats. This perhaps has been the biggest change that has come about in the process. Even we planned our wedding with our dj via video chat. Specifically with skype offering group chat ability. In the past getting a bride and groom and the dj's schedule to all line up was challenging, but now they can be in different locations and still be able to all meet, or to even bring a wedding planner into the meeting.
- clients expect deposits and contracts to be done electronically as well. I haven't mailed a contract since 2016 and out of the 68 events I booked in the last 11 months, 49/68 events paid their deposits by credit card.
- clients have become aware that online reviews are less important... but rather a combination of price point, videos, and reviews that determine if you're worth the price... and of course the actual communication you have with clients.
- fast responses are expected... in the past 24 hrs was acceptable... now its 12hrs or less (even if it's an email sent from your phone to acknowledge you'll get back to them in more detail later)
- more and more venues are now asking for insurance, and a number are now asking for worker's comp proof.

So the industry has changed on a number of fronts... not all of them are equipment based, but many of them are due to technological advancements and the ability to provide convenience and proper customer service. The observations I've made are based on my personal experiences, but also one's that many I network with are experiencing when it comes to their discussions with couples prior to booking. Being 31 and my sis being 28 and wife 30... we also hear what others who are planning a wedding are experiencing... the most common "why does no one respond fast enough" and "why can't i find prices anywhere".
 

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
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#15
I think there have been MASSIVE changes in the last 4 yrs... at least for my area. Here's what I've noticed:
- 2 moving heads on trussing are practically the norm now.
- clients I've noticed know the difference between automated lights that go randomly to the music, and lights that are computer controlled with a light tech. I've been asked about this a number of times this year specifically due to bad experiences from friends who thought they were getting "intelligent" lighting, only to discover it was going crazy during a first dance or the uplights were flashing like crazy and didn't match the atmosphere.
- clients want a dj that provides many options/enhancements... it doesn't mean they want to book a lot of options, but they want a dj with that ability in case they have interest in something later on.
- dancing on clouds and sparklers are picking up in popularity.
- photo booths are VERY popular... but moreso the ones with cool features such as text messaging, video/gif/boomerang modes, mirror booths, and quality props. Also people are paying mroe attention to the quality of the images that print.
- clients are looking online for input on music more than ever... user generated spotify lists... covers of songs not available online except youtube... etc etc.
- couples are also asking for songs to be cut quicker, and for a dj to have the ability to mix in a large variety of music more than in the past.
- clients are searching online more than ever, and expecting pricing to be listed more than ever (recent weddingwire report that came out yesterday also stated this)
- clients care very much about the dj's set up now. The top 10% of dj's in my area have all started a shift to podium style booths or a custom booth of some sort... facades are phasing out slowly where applicable.
- Clients expect some sort of online portal now for planning. After hearing more and more that their friends did things online... they expect the same convenience
- while multi ops may be fading in some areas, they are still popular here... and most single ops have a hard time breaking through. The common question with single ops I get and others mention is do we have someone on site that can take over in case of an issue. I personally always bring an assistant dj to every event that can take over, but many I know are one man shows.
- less in person meetings, more video chats. This perhaps has been the biggest change that has come about in the process. Even we planned our wedding with our dj via video chat. Specifically with skype offering group chat ability. In the past getting a bride and groom and the dj's schedule to all line up was challenging, but now they can be in different locations and still be able to all meet, or to even bring a wedding planner into the meeting.
- clients expect deposits and contracts to be done electronically as well. I haven't mailed a contract since 2016 and out of the 68 events I booked in the last 11 months, 49/68 events paid their deposits by credit card.
- clients have become aware that online reviews are less important... but rather a combination of price point, videos, and reviews that determine if you're worth the price... and of course the actual communication you have with clients.
- fast responses are expected... in the past 24 hrs was acceptable... now its 12hrs or less (even if it's an email sent from your phone to acknowledge you'll get back to them in more detail later)
- more and more venues are now asking for insurance, and a number are now asking for worker's comp proof.

So the industry has changed on a number of fronts... not all of them are equipment based, but many of them are due to technological advancements and the ability to provide convenience and proper customer service. The observations I've made are based on my personal experiences, but also one's that many I network with are experiencing when it comes to their discussions with couples prior to booking. Being 31 and my sis being 28 and wife 30... we also hear what others who are planning a wedding are experiencing... the most common "why does no one respond fast enough" and "why can't i find prices anywhere".

WOW...What a awesome holiday party! This group danced much more than they did last year! I was a bit surprised! I went 60 minutes over time. It was suppose to end at 11:00. Went to Mid Night, and got some over time cash money :) I am wide awake at 2 a.m.

Now onto your inferences about the last 5 years.

-2 Moving heads on Truss might seem normal in your market, but I guarantee you across the country, it is not normal at all. Probably less than 10% of working DJs have truss, or totems, and set it up at their events nation wide ...The Country Club I was at tonight which does parties every weekend...I asked the banquet manager if he ever sees DJs bring in large truss or BIG light shows. ...He said in 5 years he has never seen it there. They have had a couple of bands bring in a over head truss with lighting on it before though. He put a chair behind my table for me as well. I asked him if most DJs sit down while they DJ. He said at least half do, but some are like me and stand most of the time. ....Interesting info from the banquet manager there.

-With controlled DMX Lighting. Yes, some clients want that, especially in your market, but most clients out there across the country do not care about the lighting. Most are certainly not going to pay more for it. I don't think this has changed over the past 20 years.

-I agree that less in person meetings are occurring. Clients today are more relaxed, and fine doing things over the phone or through Skype video. So much more business is done today through the internet, and in virtual form compared to the past. Less human, face to face interaction is becoming the norm in all aspects of life

- Agreed about mailing contracts. I stopped mailing my agreements out about 3 years ago. The only time I will is if a client specifically requests it that way.

-Agreed about the reviews. Reviews were a big thing for about 7 or 8 years, but I think it's become more of a fad. People were reviewing anything they could for a while online. Last 2 years this has been shifting.

- Fast responses. - I have been WAY ahead of that curve for years now. I have always responded to emails in less than 4 hours. Most of the time today, I respond in under 60 minutes. The only times that I don't respond in 4 hours is if I am on vacation, OR actually deejaying. My response time on Gig Masters has been under 3 hours for like 8 years. Average response time of vendors 8 years ago was 22 hours. About 4 years ago, that came down to 12 hours and now that decreased. Now the average is only 9 hours for the entire website's vendors.

I think that people in general have to be realistic about that though. I find that still many large companies can take DAYS to respond to an inquiry, or customer service issue sent via online message or email. Most are getting quicker, but it still seems that 48 to 72 hours is typical among many. I wonder if that will change along with the younger generation's expectations at all?


- Insurance...I dunno. That statement has been said by various vendors for the last 10 years just about - "More, and more venues are asking for insurance!" ....I find that some years, I get an uptick in venues asking for this, while other years, it seems like just 1. ...The country club I was at tonight did not ask for it. However, the wedding venue I am at tomorrow did ask for it to be sent in. ...I am at a very high end hotel next weekend. Nobody has asked for COI yet on that one. ...Now compared to say 15 years ago...YES...many venues ask for it today compared to way back then. No one asked for it back then.
 
Likes: DJKLEEN

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
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#16
I have to add a comment about the photo booths

Since photo booths were introduced, I NEVER grasped the concept of how Deejaying has anything to do with Photo booths????

Somehow, Photographers totally missed the opportunity it seems to grab that market. There were only a handful of lefit photo booth companies out there, so DJs seemed to fill the void. Now majority of Photo booths in operation are offered by DJs, LOL. 15 years ago I never would have thought DJs and photo booths together would be a thing, but here we are!

I personally wont ever get into that head ache. I'm happy to sub contract a photo booth though. BUT every time I have tried to do it, the clients tell me they can get a better deal direct on a PB. I don't take any offense to that, because it's true, so I move on.

....Now, I believe photo booths are kind of in a stuck state in terms of how much money you can charge for them. ...I don't believe pricing will ever increase, but I also believe that the amount that can be charged on them have come down low enough to a point that they are probably as low as they will get. ...Moving forward, the higher end tech involved will be demanded by clients, but I seriously doubt that will mean more revenue from sales on photo booths being generated.

... I do think that the photo booth with a human attendant will become obsolete though as the robot photo booth phase takes over in the near future. The newer photo booths are basically plug and play any way. A person should be able to set up, and let the guests play with it during the event, and no attendant around...that seems to be where the market is going to go any way! Photo booths are going to be around a long time. They are a proven Novelty Add On now.


Dancing in the Clouds. - Never really caught on Nation wide, and I do not see it ever catching on more than it did a few years ago. Only a handful of clients are going for that. It's a rare thing in the D.C. Maryland/VA market. If it were catching on we would certainly see many more DJs posting about it and leaving videos/pics online, but that is a add on that seldom does.



My brother and I had a conversation about the future of DJ biz a few months ago. He firmly believes we have that the DJ Expo in Atlantic City will come to an end before 2025 due to less patronage, and vendors dropping out. He thinks the Equipment/GEAR industry for DJs will suffer a big decline in the coming years due to changing environment, and buying habits of the public. That and if we get a mediocre to major recession in the coming years, it will be like a nail in the coffin for the equipment manufacturers who's primary customer are DJs. ...I guess we will have to wait until we near 2025 to see if he is right.
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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www.djtaso.com
#17
Trends seem to start up here and slowly make their way to the rest of the country. For example, many venues in Philly are starting to adopt a small dance set of 15 minutes right after the first dance. Happened at todays wedding too. So while 2 heads is practically the norm here, I suspect it will slowly make its way to other cities as well. One thing I do notice though is that around here we have many more multi ops as opposed to individuals like myself doing it full time and offering such a variety of enhancements. Big multi ops have significantly more buying power than most single ops. Being that your area and most others are comprised primarily of single ops, I don't think they'll be as willing to spend $2000 on 2 heads with trusses. For now, couples seeking that production will look to the city guys to provide it. This again applies for effects like dancing on the clouds and sparklers. Single ops wont be able to easily invest in such items... where as multiops can. Around here the big companies all offer sparklers... but for me to invest $15000 (yes 15k) in the ones that the venues allow is a bit much for me to bear at the moment, and for now will have to sit out on that option. Regardless of what I am able to do, the trends are still the trends.

Why dj's offer photo booths more than photogs... beats me. I suspect it has to do with labor. DJ's tend to have teams, especially the dj's that do production, so it's easier for them to staff it. I personally have 9 guys on staff to take care of it. Dj companies are also more known for providing add ons that enhance the experience at the actual event. Photogs and videogs provide albums and such. Most of them are 1-2 man teams, and to find someone just for a photo booth isn't as easy. The videographer I used for my wedding actually contacted me to see if I wanted his booth since he's giving up on it. He constantly has to turn down bookings bc he doesn't have staff. He only can book it when he has an extra videographer off that day.

And as far as pricing goes... I personally am getting 600-750 for the booth depending on the bundle, and am about to invest in a new "selfie" booth. Its a simplified photo booth based on the ipad camera, designed to take a single photo... no backdrops, no props, no printouts... and no staff needed. It's able to be placed anywhere, even by the dj booth facing the dancefloor for quick on the go photos. Photos are delivered via text or email, and an online gallery is available in real time. I plan on offering this for $500, or $400 if they combine it with the photo booth (one for actual prints with a higher quality camera, with props and a nice backdrop, and one for the dancefloor for quick on the go photos. It's all about capturing moments at events now.

Years ago trends were more local, but now with the internet and all these photos and blogs being shared... one can't help but get ideas from others all over the country. Being able to afford it is a different question, but they're exposed to it.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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#18
Taso nailed it. Such things will not hurt us DJs that can truly mix and read a crowd. Also such a thing won't know what songs to play and when.

My experience is going to a family reunion where they had a cheap BT speaker that had lights. I believe they were playing a CD and there was a slight pause in between each song being mixed. That means they copied a CD using Windows Media Player. The sound was horrible. Actually it was down right ugly! So you polished professional DJs keep your head up high and have no fear. People using such a thing if they were to decide to book a DJ, what they would be looking to pay would more than likely be $150 or less. Those people don't value what a true professional DJ does.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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#20
Just don't lump us together ...
I didn't lump anybody together. I said those professionals that do certain things. Not all of us as Taso said are the same and can do the same thing. One of the reasons people book me is because of specialty at mixing music.
 
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