Your prediction on this business in the next few years

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DJ Ricky B

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Mar 9, 2015
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I remember when people thought that digital music would kill this industry.
It has not.
I think that it due in part to some very talented DJ's who make hiring one worth the cost.
Remember when they said that self checkouts at the grocery store...
or that ordering kiosks at fast food joints would eliminate jobs?
(and now we can't find enough workers, even at an above average wage)
Hell, some of can remember when people worried that computers and robots would replace us all.
I'll agree with Bob.
"The future is in stage talent, emcees and actual performers."

Interesting. There seems to be conflicting view points on this. I think that 20 years ago, this was very true. However, I have seen many things changing as discussed in this video. Being a very good MC is a very good attribute, BUT it seems to not at all be at the forefront of people's minds when they go to book a DJ for their wedding. Especially currently!

This DJ put out a video talking about how AI could be replacing DJs in general in the future...hhhmmm.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSjjeWQVJes
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

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Oct 16, 2011
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Interesting. There seems to be conflicting view points on this. I think that 20 years ago, this was very true. However, I have seen many things changing as discussed in this video. Being a very good MC is a very good attribute, BUT it seems to not at all be at the forefront of people's minds when they go to book a DJ for their wedding. Especially currently!

This DJ put out a video talking about how AI could be replacing DJs in general in the future...hhhmmm.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSjjeWQVJes
It won't crush me.
 
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djtaso

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Apr 4, 2017
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Interesting. There seems to be conflicting view points on this. I think that 20 years ago, this was very true. However, I have seen many things changing as discussed in this video. Being a very good MC is a very good attribute, BUT it seems to not at all be at the forefront of people's minds when they go to book a DJ for their wedding. Especially currently!

This DJ put out a video talking about how AI could be replacing DJs in general in the future...hhhmmm.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSjjeWQVJes
Mixing in a sense is an art… the technology can create a mix, but it’s not present to read the crowd in the moment. It can do good… it can’t do great. On top of that it can’t replace the personality when it comes to planning, mceeing, communication, and being someone the clients can trust throughout the process.

again all this stuff affects the low end to mid range djs. It’s like watches… there’s a reason why certain watches cost 50k… they don’t tell time different, it the manner in which it is created and the craftsmanship and artistry behind it that does have a difference compared to the machine made watch.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

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What happens if the machine breaks down? Who will fix it at an event? Remember anything man made is subject to failure and the way things ar made today, most things are made to last only so long before it will need to be replaced.
 
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DJ Ricky B

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What happens if the machine breaks down? Who will fix it at an event? Remember anything man made is subject to failure and the way things ar made today, most things are made to last only so long before it will need to be replaced.

That is one thing people will figure out with time. This is why I don't think changes like this will take hold any time soon.

Even if a service starts where they take care of set up and tear down, and a "tech" making sure everything is good to go, someone at the party will need to be in charge of overseeing the equipment at least loosely. Someone still needs to make announcements. However, if they figure out a way to do remote announcements from a professional MC that could be a game changer. Still, remote/virtual has it's limitations.

I don;t foresee much changing in the next 5 years, and probably not 10 years. DJs will still be needed for weddings. 20 years? Who knows. I will be 59 at that point and at least currently, I plan to have exited the business by age 59. If I am still doing events it will be just a handful a year, and probably for older folks at that point.
 

Kevin Nichols

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Jul 20, 2006
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Those who have an established brand of service & a target market (like you and Taso) will continue to succeed. Multi DJ Ops & Agencies will continue to do what they do. Technology will continue toward the wireless end, and Mobile DJs will continue to debate whether they are full-time or part-time and how much they are really worth. :djsmug:
Don't forget about Serato vs. VDJ! LOL
 

Albatross

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Sep 7, 2016
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Being a very good MC is a very good attribute, BUT it seems to not at all be at the forefront of people's minds when they go to book a DJ for their wedding. Especially currently!
I also think there is a distinction between being great on the mic, and being a good facilitator.

It's almost clockwork that when I tell a couple that toasts are coming up in 5 minutes they ask for a break to use the restroom. Or you get ready to do something and realize one of the parents has wandered off and we aren't actually ready for a father daughter dance like we were planning.

Part of doing a good job at a wedding is looking for things like that and helping to corral people as much as it is making the announcement itself. I'm not a super wordy MC, I say basically what needs to be said. But I still add value in getting everyone prepared, staged, working with the video team and photographers. By the time I ask people to hold their conversations for the toasts... 95% of the work on making them go well has already taken place.

Maybe in some world the AI will digitally ID everyone and make sure they're all in the room in addition to building great mashups. But I think there is a lot of judgement that goes into that.

Or think about how an AI system would handle requests. If you turn it into a jukebox style system where people can make a request... you also have to give it some filtering system of what you don't want it to play. Which in a human DJ world... I can act as a gatekeeper for bad requests, and more specifically I don't automatically pass that blame on to my client. I'd rather the requester think I'm the jerk that won't play the Cha Cha Slide rather than tell them the couple doesn't want it. Because if they know the couple is in charge, they'll go bug them with their request. Can you imagine a wedding where the couple spend the night trying to explain to their guests why the AI Juke Box won't play Journey - Don't Stop Believing just because they were tired of hearing it?

There is no question that a computer can match up a couple BPMs, can be taught phrasing, and can learn how to blend music together as well or better than a human. But the nuance of what we do, and the judgement being exercised, and the tact in how we should be dealing with different situations... I think that's awfully tough to teach a computer.
 

dunlopj

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Aug 14, 2008
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Part of doing a good job at a wedding is looking for things like that and helping to corral people as much as it is making the announcement itself. I'm not a super wordy MC, I say basically what needs to be said. But I still add value in getting everyone prepared, staged, working with the video team and photographers.
Well summarized. I used to tell my bride's, part of my duties was to be a form of a "tour guide" to make sure what they wanted to happen occurs WHEN and HOW they dream it should...
 

sawdust123

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Nov 10, 2006
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Technology will march forward and make much of what we do easier. When one aspect of the job gets easier, we have time to focus on other ways to improve and differentiate our service level. Failure to improve comes with the risk of becoming a commodity.

Ross brings up the cat-herding aspect of coordinating a wedding. Technology can solve that. Imagine a small pager-like device that the wedding party (or even the other vendors) can wear unobtrusively to let them know what is coming up next. Those that employ the device have events that run smoother. It will take a while for it to become mainstream (assuming it is successful) and by then, you can find another way to differentiate.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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No comment...only 'cause I have a kind heart. :cheers: Plus I doubt you'll be DJ'ing in 20 years.
If I'm still alive I will still be a DJ. :humble: Simple question. How many feel modern technology will replace them as the DJ doing events?
 
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sonic-vision

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Feb 6, 2007
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central Ohio
Replacing the dj has been tried for many years. I-pod weddings where a big craze & showed that a good reception DJ is worth the money.
what are we going to do next? I know I have that song somewhere? Can everybody hear ? Let me start the song over.
am I playing the right song? I can't get the song to play! Why are all the guests leaving? We forgot to cut the cake.
Can someone else take over the music? I have to leave early.
 

RobDawg

Well-Known DJ
Jan 21, 2019
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I think, at least in my area (Seattle) where we had very strict restrictions, even some now (masks outside at sporting events?), we'll see a trend towards smaller weddings. No more 150+ guests. All my weddings were 60-80 guests, even after limits were lifted, and just as much fun or more fun than the big ones of 2019 and earlier. No more inviting your accountant or real estate agent to the wedding. Haven't seen or heard from you in a year? No invite. Again, this is for my area where we were forced to downsize everything and I think people learned that you don't need to have this huge blowouts to impress your acquaintances. Of course there are some areas where that will always be the case.
 

djtaso

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I think, at least in my area (Seattle) where we had very strict restrictions, even some now (masks outside at sporting events?), we'll see a trend towards smaller weddings. No more 150+ guests. All my weddings were 60-80 guests, even after limits were lifted, and just as much fun or more fun than the big ones of 2019 and earlier. No more inviting your accountant or real estate agent to the wedding. Haven't seen or heard from you in a year? No invite. Again, this is for my area where we were forced to downsize everything and I think people learned that you don't need to have this huge blowouts to impress your acquaintances. Of course there are some areas where that will always be the case.
The issue with the smaller events comes with very heavy cultural events. They tend to have A LOT of family. In NJ, we were doing indoor weddings up to 150 since last August. The ONLY ones that were still cancelling were the huge greek or other cultural families that had so much family, there was no way they could get below 150.
 

RobDawg

Well-Known DJ
Jan 21, 2019
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The issue with the smaller events comes with very heavy cultural events. They tend to have A LOT of family. In NJ, we were doing indoor weddings up to 150 since last August. The ONLY ones that were still cancelling were the huge greek or other cultural families that had so much family, there was no way they could get below 150.
I was thinking of you when I said other areas :). It seems like every wedding I see in the tri-state area is over-the-top compared to what we have out here. We have a few big ones but those are, like you said, the cultural weddings. Otherwise it's at a vineyard or barn.
 
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djtaso

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I was thinking of you when I said other areas :). It seems like every wedding I see in the tri-state area is over-the-top compared to what we have out here. We have a few big ones but those are, like you said, the cultural weddings. Otherwise it's at a vineyard or barn.
The wedding industry here is a massive industry and also the landscape of the area don't really offer those vineyard or barn type venues or venues where you just rent the space. Here we have Wedding and Private Event Venues all over the place... and they set the standard by requiring a certain number of guests... many of the best venues require 200+ guests for a Saturday in peak season, so again, you want the nice venue, you need a big guest count. The over the top is because of the standards just being raised higher and higher and people looking for that next best thing. Not just from the couples... but venues are competing with each other too to see who can offer the most extravagant locations and menu items or photo spots, or photographers seeking who can create the most unreal photos, or dj's with the effects. The competition is just unreal.
 
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sawdust123

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Nov 10, 2006
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All my weddings were 60-80 guests, even after limits were lifted, and just as much fun or more fun than the big ones of 2019 and earlier. No more inviting your accountant or real estate agent to the wedding. Haven't seen or heard from you in a year? No invite.
I used to jokingly say that my wife and I put off our wedding reception until Covid had whittled down the guest list to a manageable number. The thing is, it has, and for just the reason you gave. Some people went out of their way to keep in touch. Others not. This was definitely noticed in putting together our invite list.
 
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DJ Ricky B

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I was thinking of you when I said other areas :). It seems like every wedding I see in the tri-state area is over-the-top compared to what we have out here. We have a few big ones but those are, like you said, the cultural weddings. Otherwise it's at a vineyard or barn.

Most of my weddings since like 2016 have been Barn or Vineyard. 3rd most popular venue type are Wedding Mansions. I see maybe one Hotel Wedding every 2-3 years since 2011.