Would you sign this?

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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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The $500 fee they collect from the person booking the event and very likely they won’t touch your equipment but they will hit the Circuit breaker. But like I said this is between the hall & client booking the events. Hopefully the client passes this on to you before you sign the contract with them. As the venue is booked first they likely know about the rules, but may think it’s no big deals. I’ve had to deal was some crazy crap went being forced to use crappy house systems. One time I had to go and get my system out the van went the house system failed. Likely I saved the event by having equipment ready. Had I not been there would the other DJ had his system ready? Same thing with this one, we know the music isn’t going to be loud enough. Then I offer the solution which they may have turned down before during planning. But it will cost plenty but will save the event. Maybe it’s all my time as working corporate event & college events, I have no program breaking its down on how things are going go. Usually the only ones who are really a PIA are other DJs or think they are a DJs.
Let me say you're assuming it won't be loud enough. You really don't know unless you're either the DJ doing an event there or a guest at the event there. It might be just good enough. Now to be fair in this case some think that to impress the client and their guest that the music needs to be blasting extra loud. My experience is that the music needs to be at a good volume so people can enjoy themselves, the DJ can clearly hear what they are mixing (for those who do mix) and not have people's ears ringing.
 

Ausumm

Gold Plated Productions
Oct 21, 2008
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As others have said
if I were already contracted, I'd bite my lip and do it their way.
(after a long discussion with the bride & groom)

If I knew about it in advance, I would pass on the gig.

We had a venue that charged brides $100 if they arrived late for dinner.
The venue also installed a power switch in the kitchen that would kill the DJ music
if they went 1 second past the contracted end time. (not a public noise ordinance)
Word got out, and the venue is no longer in business.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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I just thought of this. If someone unplugged our gear while we were performing at an event, I would file a lawsuit against either them or the venue. Probably wouldn't win but I would make an example of them. I would look for a TV court show for the case.
 

adj2ent

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 20, 2006
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I just thought of this. If someone unplugged our gear while we were performing at an event, I would file a lawsuit against either them or the venue. Probably wouldn't win but I would make an example of them. I would look for a TV court show for the case.
If a employee from the venue unplugs the power and something is damaged then you can sue the venue. Of cause if you violated their rules which cause them to shut you down I wouldn’t expect to winner. Although in 40+ years I’ve never had anything damaged because of a lost of power. Be it a breaker, generator dying or A hole pulling the plug, no damage.
 

sonic-vision

Alive & kickin
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Feb 6, 2007
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central Ohio
I just thought of this. If someone unplugged our gear while we were performing at an event, I would file a lawsuit against either them or the venue. Probably wouldn't win but I would make an example of them. I would look for a TV court show for the case.
Maybe one too many today Mixy??
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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If someone shut us down like that it would take everything in me to remain professional. I remember a DJ on here said a guest who was drunk went and touched their gear because they wanted a song played right then and there. He said he had to get on the mic to get people to get the guy away from him so he could continue working. Sad something like this happened.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

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How many of you have had an event to do and when you got there to do the event you found out about things like this that restricted you from doing things the way you normally do things?
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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I would refer them to the client (who by contract is the entity responsible for my immediate supervision.) I do not have any authority to agree to a $500 fee imposed on someone else, nor does any agreement I might make with the venue legally supersede one that I made with the client. BOTH agreements would be legally binding despite any obvious conflict - meaning I could be simultaneously liable for damages to both parties no matter what side of the argument they are on.

My only responsibility to the venue is to abide by applicable federal, state, and municipal codes, and whatever agreements the client has made with them.
 

dunlopj

DJ Extraordinaire
Aug 14, 2008
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Belair MD
He said he had to get on the mic to get people to get the guy away from him so he could continue working. Sad something like this happened.

I've had that happen a few times...maybe like twice in 24 years. But if you stick to more "reliable" venues, it rarely occurs.:pillyes:
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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The venues rules are not an issue for me. The venues dishonesty is the real problem.
The venue is attempting to enjoin the vendor in a third party agreement - which is quite plainly a form of fraud.

The venue is demonstrating prior knowledge of this because they have assigned the $500 fee to the client - not the DJ. Any court arbitrating a conflict would quickly cite this as an unenforceable.

Ultimately, responsibility for compliance with any noise ordinance falls upon the venue and NO ONE ELSE.
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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You have no legal recourse if someone unplugs you from a power source that they own and control.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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First this is on the client who agrees to have their event in such a venue. Now I say the client should let any DJ they contact about doing their event for them in such a venue know of the restrictions placed on the DJ. After knowing these things and agree to do the event, it's on them to abide by the venues rules. It's not the DJs venue. Just like in your own place where you live, you decide how you want things to be. If someone comes in your where you live at and doesn't want to go by your rules, you have a right to ask them to leave because it's your house and not theirs.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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Bob I hear you. The question was would you sign this? I'll say it again. If I was to get contacted about doing an event in that venue, I would hope the client would let me know of this. That way I can make a decision if I want to do their event or not. I would be highly upset if I agreed to do the event there and found these restrictions when I get there, instead of given a heads up ahead of time. At times these things will happen. At least that was the case with us. I say if you're forced into such a thing, then I would just suck it up and do the best job I can. Now if I had another client who booked that venue and contacted me about doing there event there, I would more then likely pass depending on how things turned out before.

Let me ask this of the members here. Have you been put in such a position? If you were put in that position, how did things turn out and what was your take on doing the event in such a situation?
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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Bob when I'm there doing an event for a client I'm not a guest. I'm working doing a job. If I were a guest I would be hanging out where the guest are and watching somebody else working.
 

Cap Capello

Always @ Ur Service
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Dec 14, 2006
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If I had a standing contract, I would void it. Period. Me not ever working there won't break them. Me not ever working there won't break me. Even steven. I've done a parking lot waltz with a dishwasher and the owner's son who threatened to pull my plug, so it's nothing new for me. There is no job so important as to subject anyone (venue, client, me) to that kind of stress.