Would you sign this?

To many ads? Support ODJT and see no ads!

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
13,284
1,865
64
Let me say this first. The reason for such a contract is because of what has happened in the past. They want to prevent this from happening going forward. The issue is that the venue probably near a residential area and the neighbors will call the police to complain. Now to avoid any vulgar language being played is to let the DJ know about this and the venue being selective as to who they rent the venue to.

Now as for would I agree to sign this? I would hope the client would explain this to the DJ before booking the DJ so they understand things clearly.

The thing about not being able to use a sub wouldn't be a big deal for me. One less piece of gear we have to bring. Myself I'm into playing clean music at events. A client who doesn't care is someone I wouldn't do an event for. My big concern would be how loud can you play the music? I don't like it when I'm forced to keep the music so low that people can't enjoy the music being played. Besides to me that's not fair to the client paying us. Let me say this. No damn body would be allowed to unplug anything of ours but us. If they did that would cause a big problem with me. All professionalism would go out the window.

I'll leave it this way. That venue would not be one that I would like to do another event in.

Now what about when you get to a venue and you find out such restrictions. How would you handle such a thing? What about dealing with a rude person working in a venue? We have encountered that. You just got to remember to keep your composure and remember to act like a professional no matter how much you may not want to. What I find is when you're new to doing an event in certain venues they can act that. Once you've been there several times they may ease up a bit if you show that you're a true professional in how you carry yourself, the way you perform while working and the way you dress for certain events is very important.
 

rickryan.com

DJ Extraordinaire
ODJT Supporter
Dec 9, 2009
18,687
16,188
58
Hendersonville, TN
www.RickRyan.com
As a venue owner, I have to deal with sound issues. While I wouldn't go as far as this venue did, I do make it clear that any outside DJ service must not use subwoofers. That is what causes issues with neighbors. Tops don't seem to throw very far so they can knock themselves out making everyone's ears bleed. As for explicit content, I won't stick my nose into that one.
 

sawdust123

Moderator
Staff member
ODJT Supporter
Nov 10, 2006
1,447
3,382
59
Ventura County, CA
Noise ordinance compliance is my specialty. I've designed and installed systems that cannot violate ordinances. In fact, the LA County department that oversees this stuff was so impressed with my work that they asked if they could refer me to other venues (which I declined). They did three 72 hour live surveys of my last sound system and found no violations. That said, being in compliance with the law is no guarantee that complaints don't get registered. If a guest has a loud muffler on their car, a complaint can get registered against the venue.

My last system had three sound monitors at the property line that logged data 24x7. We would look at the charts to establish baseline ambient noise by hour of the day. The only time you really saw the venue exceed the baseline was during the recessional when all the guests would cheer (or when maybe sing along to Sweet Caroline). That didn't stop complaints though. The venue even got complaints on nights they didn't even have events. Some other neighbor in the area could be having a noisy party but the neighborhood complainer is still going to lodge the complaint against the venue. This happened quite a lot at multiple venues I have worked with.

I could drive a truck through the holes in the policies of the venue Jeff is dealing with. It doesn't matter. Local law enforcement has no clue what the noise ordinances are or how to make proper measurements with a sound meter. It all comes down to subjective evaluation in the moment. The first thing an enforcement officer is going to do is determine if the complainer seems more reasonable than the venue/DJ. If you act like a dick, you will lose. You can still be declared a public nuisance without violating a noise ordinance. Like I said, it is purely subjective.

Of the policies Jeff is being asked to sign, item 6 gives me the most grief. It amounts to a gag order. I don't like it at all. And of course item 8 is the most laughable. They are going to invite the authorities to their own venue? No business owner in their right mind would do that. Counties keep records on how many times they have visited a venue. They don't sort them by who called. Besides, what do they hope to charge you with... trespassing? Maybe they also call the authorities if you don't put the seat back down after peeing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ittigger

adj2ent

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 20, 2006
1,262
2,681
62
Long Island NY
Requirements like this get laid on the client and then get down passed to me. If the client chooses to have the event at the location then they are bound by the rules of the venue. If the client thinks they circumvent the rules they are mistaken. Just like if a police said turn it down or off, it goes it goes down or off. Most of the times with these locations they have noise complaints from residents in the area. That’s the issue, the main issue. I have a headphone system which is the solution to part of the problem. The other issue is even with the headphones people sing loudly & scream. But the problem won’t be the loud music. Why a person would choose to have a party at a venue will these restrictions, I don’t know. I’d find a different location, would I work in the location, yes, I get paid in advance. Then I offer a solution, the headphones.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ittigger

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,625
9,612
35
NJ
www.djtaso.com
Been in this situation as an assistant back in the day... although no where near as extreme. I learned to never accept this. It was the absolute worst party ever. Venue said it'll be plenty loud so the couple just went with it, but on the day of they were furious with the venue, and we couldn't do a thing. The venue shut down within a year mostly due to this issue (the venue in fact was beautiful). However, on the day of, during those 4hrs... we the dj's looked like the ones that sucked and had crappy equipment. For everyone person that we explained the circumstance to that came up to tell us to turn it up... there were 5 who didn't and just assumed it was our choice.

So again... for something like that I say no. And honestly (and I hate to say it to Ricky), when they say no Sub woofers... that's the first warning sign. Keep in mind, many of today's column systems either require the sub for the purpose of distributing the audio like the LD Maui 44, or in my case, without the sub will sound ABSOLUTELY TERRIBLE. So more and more dj's will not be able to satisfy that requirement.

On a side note... I also don't perform on house systems unless I get a waiver absolving me of any responsibility if something happens to their system. Every venue when I ask that seems to say ok to me bringing my own afterwards lol.
 

sonic-vision

Alive & kickin
ODJT Supporter
Feb 6, 2007
2,286
4,139
central Ohio
I'd give it a try once if the money made the job attractive & I am up for a challenge .
 
  • Like
Reactions: ittigger

sawdust123

Moderator
Staff member
ODJT Supporter
Nov 10, 2006
1,447
3,382
59
Ventura County, CA
The way to keep the overall volume down is to use A LOT of small speakers and create zones of coverage. This is just like an airport. Can you imagine an entire terminal with just two speakers at one end? Of course not. Instead, every gate has its zone. It is loud at the gate but if you are at the airport bar 50 feet away you can barely hear the announcements. It is kind of like listening to a headphone at an arms length. The headphone is loud on your head but barely audible at arms length.

The venues with these issues should invest in their own distributed speaker systems and just have the DJs plug into it. These are the kind of systems I designed. It is insane to think that a DJ would carry a distributed sound system.
 

Albatross

DJ Extraordinaire
ODJT Supporter
Sep 7, 2016
2,951
7,801
If I was already contracted, I'd probably sign it and complete the event. I also would be very unlikely to return to the venue or ever book anything there again.

I'm completely over dealing with venues that are not set up to host events properly.

I would also explain to the client in excruciating detail what was being asked of me, and make sure that I correctly set their expectation for how it will impact their event.
 

rickryan.com

DJ Extraordinaire
ODJT Supporter
Dec 9, 2009
18,687
16,188
58
Hendersonville, TN
www.RickRyan.com
The way to keep the overall volume down is to use A LOT of small speakers and create zones of coverage. This is just like an airport. Can you imagine an entire terminal with just two speakers at one end? Of course not. Instead, every gate has its zone. It is loud at the gate but if you are at the airport bar 50 feet away you can barely hear the announcements. It is kind of like listening to a headphone at an arms length. The headphone is loud on your head but barely audible at arms length.

The venues with these issues should invest in their own distributed speaker systems and just have the DJs plug into it. These are the kind of systems I designed. It is insane to think that a DJ would carry a distributed sound system.

Yeah, but let's be honest. Most DJs want to use their own system, and will kick up dust if they're required to use someone else's.
 

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
7,271
5,679
40
If I was already contracted, I'd probably sign it and complete the event. I also would be very unlikely to return to the venue or ever book anything there again.

I'm completely over dealing with venues that are not set up to host events properly.

I would also explain to the client in excruciating detail what was being asked of me, and make sure that I correctly set their expectation for how it will impact their event.


I agree. I mean, we DJs don't ever get to see this a document like this until one or two weeks before the actual event. Once its already booked, it's pretty much too late to refuse to sign the document. You will look like the A hole with the client. Just sign it, and go get the job done. I would talk with the client about the hinderance of the venue policies beforehand though.

Now, if this paper is presented as I am setting up at the venue, I will make sure the bride and groom and planner know about it.

I have to LOL at # 6 on the document talking about the DJ is not allowed to make negative statements to anyone about their policy! NEVER have I seen that one before.

For the record, I have no problem not using subwoofers. I am headed to a karaoke corporate job tonight in Baltimore, and I am only using two 12 inch tops. Bringing my Bose S1 Pro as a back up.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
13,284
1,865
64
The way to keep the overall volume down is to use A LOT of small speakers and create zones of coverage. This is just like an airport. Can you imagine an entire terminal with just two speakers at one end? Of course not. Instead, every gate has its zone. It is loud at the gate but if you are at the airport bar 50 feet away you can barely hear the announcements. It is kind of like listening to a headphone at an arms length. The headphone is loud on your head but barely audible at arms length.

The venues with these issues should invest in their own distributed speaker systems and just have the DJs plug into it. These are the kind of systems I designed. It is insane to think that a DJ would carry a distributed sound system.
Taso made a great point. If it's a in house system that could be used I agree with a waiver that if something happens to the system we're not responsible. Personally I would rather use what we have. We know how it works. We know what to do with it. We know it's strenghts and weakness. If something happens to it it's on us. Also I know how it sounds and it sounds GREAT!

We did 2 events that I remember the sound issue came up. The first was a lady that my partner knew had us come and do an event outside on a Sunday before a holiday. Someone called to complain and the police showed up. It just so happened I personally knew one of the police men. We used to live in the same neighborhood and from somewhere else. He told me if they came back they would confiscate the gear. We shut it down and left in spite of people telling us we could turn it down. Sad note both the cop and the lady died a short time ago.

The other one happened in a venue we had done several events in before. This time we were forced to keep the music down to a whisper. It was so low that we couldn't hear what we were mixing and nobody could enjoy themselves. As it was stated it made us look bad but our hands were tied. I never found out why this time we were forced to do things this way when in the past no problem.
 
Last edited:

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
13,284
1,865
64
I think the title for this thread is wrong. This should not be about if any of us would sign this but what the person looking to book this venuew. Do they sign this agreement or look for another venue to have the event? I say if they agree to this then theye should look to find a SJ who is willing to do the event. Make sure they get a copy of the agreement and when looking for a DJ to do the event, let them know about the agreement, what the can and can not do. then let them decide if they want to agree to do the event. Myself as one member said I would be worried about how this would make us look in front of the client and their guest attending the event. You don't want anybody looking at you negatively for something that's out of your control.
 

sawdust123

Moderator
Staff member
ODJT Supporter
Nov 10, 2006
1,447
3,382
59
Ventura County, CA
Yeah, but let's be honest. Most DJs want to use their own system, and will kick up dust if they're required to use someone else's.
Agreed. Some DJs refused to play at the venues I worked with. Venues don't care. There are way more DJs than venues. Most brides prefer the eye candy over the ear candy. I wrote instructions for the DJs that the venue would give out. It had my contact info and several DJs would call me before their first gig there to get the rundown. There was also an instruction manual with the system with my phone number in it.

The speakers for the dance floor were overhead and aimed downward. No ones ears were more than 6-8 feet from a speaker while dancing. It got pretty loud except for the lack of low bass. For the DJs that worked there regularly, it was a love/hate thing. They loved the easy setup and teardown. They lamented the lack of bass.

I really wouldn't mind designing these systems again. The tools available now are so much better. I would probably use a QSC Q-SYS system. That would afford me multiple plug-in spots, tablet, phone or wall controls. I could even employ subwoofers that automatically shut off at a certain hour, etc. The programmability options are endless.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
13,284
1,865
64
I have a question for us. Would you agree to do an event in tat venue? I would be leary about doing an event there. I would be concerned if those rules would make us look bad and cost us business?
 

Jeff Romard

Administrator
Staff member
ODJT Supporter
Sep 4, 2006
21,222
20,050
52
Sydney, Nova Scotia
If I was already contracted, I'd probably sign it and complete the event. I also would be very unlikely to return to the venue or ever book anything there again.

I'm completely over dealing with venues that are not set up to host events properly.

I would also explain to the client in excruciating detail what was being asked of me, and make sure that I correctly set their expectation for how it will impact their event.

This is pretty much what I would do too. I'm a bit curious how do they propose to collect the $500 if we get to step 2? I'm not paying it voluntarily

I also have major issues with anyone touching my gear step 3 wouldn't end well
 

sawdust123

Moderator
Staff member
ODJT Supporter
Nov 10, 2006
1,447
3,382
59
Ventura County, CA
This is pretty much what I would do too. I'm a bit curious how do they propose to collect the $500 if we get to step 2? I'm not paying it voluntarily

I also have major issues with anyone touching my gear step 3 wouldn't end well
The $500 fine is to the client, not the DJ. The B&G are the clients. There is no business relationship between the venue and the DJ.
 

adj2ent

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 20, 2006
1,262
2,681
62
Long Island NY
The $500 fee they collect from the person booking the event and very likely they won’t touch your equipment but they will hit the Circuit breaker. But like I said this is between the hall & client booking the events. Hopefully the client passes this on to you before you sign the contract with them. As the venue is booked first they likely know about the rules, but may think it’s no big deals. I’ve had to deal was some crazy crap went being forced to use crappy house systems. One time I had to go and get my system out the van went the house system failed. Likely I saved the event by having equipment ready. Had I not been there would the other DJ had his system ready? Same thing with this one, we know the music isn’t going to be loud enough. Then I offer the solution which they may have turned down before during planning. But it will cost plenty but will save the event. Maybe it’s all my time as working corporate event & college events, I have no program breaking its down on how things are going go. Usually the only ones who are really a PIA are other DJs or think they are a DJs.