Wireless mics

sawdust123

Well-Known DJ
Nov 10, 2006
163
56
Ventura County, CA
We are currently in phase 3 (or is it now 4) of the 10 phases of the 600 MHz changeover. I believe the end of this year marks phase 9. T-Mobile has been offering broadcasters cash incentives to hurry the transition ahead of the published schedule as well. As TV stations move to spots below 600 MHz, there will be fewer empty TV channels in which to operate mics (some markets will have none). If you are lucky enough to find empty channels in your market in 2020, it will have more background noise due to intermodulation products from neighboring channels. Good mics have expensive filtering to deal with this problem. Cheap ones do not. Many manufacturers have opened up the tuning range of their mics but not all brands/models offer improved filters.

Diversity reception is a vague term. There are many different types of diversity. There is passive and active antenna diversity. There are also dual independent receiver designs. The latter is way more expensive and more effective. If the deal looks too good, be wary of what you are getting.

BTW, RickyB, professionals spend $3-5K per channel on wireless systems used in high-density RF environments. During SuperBowl week, there are 4000+ requests to operate wireless transmitters around the stadium. Cheap mics need not apply. My buddy handles the wireless for the refs and halftime show. He now needs to use people aiming highly directional antennae at the performers as if they were spotlights to insure he maintains a decent signal to noise ratio. He started doing that BEFORE the loss of the 600 MHz band. It isn't going to get any easier for us DJs once that band is gone.
 

Handinon

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 1, 2014
1,866
72
BTW, RickyB, professionals spend $3-5K per channel on wireless systems used in high-density RF environments. During SuperBowl week, there are 4000+ requests to operate wireless transmitters around the stadium. Cheap mics need not apply. My buddy handles the wireless for the refs and halftime show. He now needs to use people aiming highly directional antennae at the performers as if they were spotlights to insure he maintains a decent signal to noise ratio. He started doing that BEFORE the loss of the 600 MHz band. It isn't going to get any easier for us DJs once that band is gone.
Which I'd assume is somewhat offset by the kickback Bose gives the NFL for the HUGE lettering on the headsets. I think it used to be Motorola?
 
Reactions: DJ Bobcat

Scott Hanna

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 25, 2006
5,761
52
Cleveland, OH
www.djincleveland.com
Which I'd assume is somewhat offset by the kickback Bose gives the NFL for the HUGE lettering on the headsets. I think it used to be Motorola?
The story I read was the NFL was using wired headsets for a while then tried to make the transition to wireless with Motorola. But because of their unique needs, there was nothing available off the shelf that was meeting their needs. They approached Bose and asked them if they could design a system just for the NFL's needs. Designing a system for only 32 customers isn't cost effective, unless that customer can put your name in front of millions