Will Dancing on the Clouds Effect have any chance of making smoke alarms go off?

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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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It's only water vapor.
No it's not.
Dry Ice is 100% Carbon Dioxide.

...and if using this product commercially we are required to carry the MSDS with us.

Water vapor is simply condensing in contact with the cold gas. The water vapor soon redissolves in the air - but the CO2 gas remains and changes the composition of the air space in which it resides. Asphyxiation is a known risk associated with improper use of Dry Ice and Nitrogen Fog machines.

Dry Ice Safety.pdf
 
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djtaso

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I also think a lot of this has to do with my area vs Bob's area. In NJ we have very few restrictions on items, whereas in the entire New England area they don't allow sparklers at any venue and they highly discourage any sort of dancing on cloud or co2 gun effect. Here, all that is allowed, virtually no questions asked. There is a lot more caution there for the small what if's than around here. So our approaches and perspective on these items are naturally different. And again, there they don't have many Wedding specific venues... where they're built from the ground up, ONLY for the purpose of hosting weddings and private events. You can see the difference in the examples he provides. There many of the venues are part of buildings that host other purposes, whether its a commercial building, a hotel, a public area, a restaurant or lounge, etc. When you have wedding venues like the one below, where there is no other activites taking place, all hvac is off in that room, and ceilings that high, there's no chance of any alarms going off.

In New England, sparkelrs must have a pyrotechnic handling the sparklers (which less than 10 exist in the NE area), as well as hiring a fire marshall to be on site, plus a permit. A $500 effect here (for 2 sparklers) is virtually a $2000 effect there.

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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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I mean, the reality is anything is possible anywhere... but we're talking about a .001% chance here...
The chances are significantly higher when people using the effect remain ignorant to the risks. Setting off an alarm is irrelevant because the true risk is invisible, and completely silent.

CO2 It is a colorless, odorless gas and about 1.5 times as heavy as air. Since it is denser than air, high concentrations can occur in open pits and other areas below grade. It is an asphyxiant and displaces oxygen, which can cause death.

Over 400 people are killed by CO2 asphyxiation in the USA each year. Some 50,000 people show up in emergency rooms each year with indications of CO2 poisoning.

The argument isn't whether fog machines are safe, they can be. The question is: "Are DJs properly and fully informed about how to use them safely? Do they even know where the risk resides?" By and large this thread suggests that no, far too many do not.

Repeat:
If you are using a Nimbus type unit - then the likelihood is quite low, because the output is minimal. However, you still need to know what to look for to avoid that one situation that is different.
 
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rickryan.com

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Dec 9, 2009
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I also think a lot of this has to do with my area vs Bob's area. In NJ we have very few restrictions on items, whereas in the entire New England area they don't allow sparklers at any venue and they highly discourage any sort of dancing on cloud or co2 gun effect. Here, all that is allowed, virtually no questions asked. There is a lot more caution there for the small what if's than around here. So our approaches and perspective on these items are naturally different. And again, there they don't have many Wedding specific venues... where they're built from the ground up, ONLY for the purpose of hosting weddings and private events. You can see the difference in the examples he provides. There many of the venues are part of buildings that host other purposes, whether its a commercial building, a hotel, a public area, a restaurant or lounge, etc. When you have wedding venues like the one below, where there is no other activites taking place, all hvac is off in that room, and ceilings that high, there's no chance of any alarms going off.

In New England, sparkelrs must have a pyrotechnic handling the sparklers (which less than 10 exist in the NE area), as well as hiring a fire marshall to be on site, plus a permit. A $500 effect here (for 2 sparklers) is virtually a $2000 effect there.

View attachment 53331
Good Lord, that's a huge area of cloud coverage. I bet I couldn't fill 1/3 of that. Absolutely incredible, other than the stupid couple not being in the center of the dance floor. ;)
 
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djtaso

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Good Lord, that's a huge area of cloud coverage. I bet I couldn't fill 1/3 of that. Absolutely incredible, other than the stupid couple not being in the center of the dance floor. ;)
That’s the funny thing, at that venue, it’s the VENUE that offers dancing on the clouds. They use an industrial sized dry ice machine. Otherwise you need at least 2 nimbus going simultaneously to have a shot of covering it. It’s like the one venue most djs don’t even bother trying to upsell dry ice at, bc of the amount of output needed
 

ProDJ Jose

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djtaso

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This new machine looks like it's even more powerful:


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFIjoVh6F5s
I’ve seen that machine, and it’s a good solution but my personal biggest issue… this needs to be plugged in to be in use. This requires its own dedicated circuit, which can create an issue at many venues, especially if you offer other items besides sound. The nimbus, while needing to be plugged in to heat up, doesn’t need to be plugged when producing the effect. So even when power is hard to find in the reception room, we can have it heating up in a side room or kitchen, and then unplug it once intros start and bring it to the dancefloor.

the other thing, and this is maybe unique to just me… is we like to drop a big bucket of fresh dry ice every 30 seconds to pump out nice big blasts of smoke. I’m not sure if this is possible w this machine, since it’s more automated/motorized
 
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