Will Dancing on the Clouds Effect have any chance of making smoke alarms go off?

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DJ Ricky B

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I just booked an October wedding next year, and the bride wants me to reach out to the venue to discuss the effect with them. She ran it by the venue manager, and the venue manager said they would like to talk with the person who does this add on effect before they say yes to it.

This is the first couple in a LONG TIME that has expressed any interest in dancing on the clouds effect. Honestly, the bride told me she wanted it from the get go. No suggesting or selling on my end.

The venue has low ceilings. I believe they are 9 foot high ceilings. Any chance a dry ice effect would trigger smoke alarms?

IF the venue approves it, I will likely be renting the equipment for the weekend from somewhere...unless I can sell this add on to more 2022 brides, then maybe a Nimbus purchase is in order!
 

djtaso

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I just booked an October wedding next year, and the bride wants me to reach out to the venue to discuss the effect with them. She ran it by the venue manager, and the venue manager said they would like to talk with the person who does this add on effect before they say yes to it.

This is the first couple in a LONG TIME that has expressed any interest in dancing on the clouds effect. Honestly, the bride told me she wanted it from the get go. No suggesting or selling on my end.

The venue has low ceilings. I believe they are 9 foot high ceilings. Any chance a dry ice effect would trigger smoke alarms?

IF the venue approves it, I will likely be renting the equipment for the weekend from somewhere...unless I can sell this add on to more 2022 brides, then maybe a Nimbus purchase is in order!
NO IT WILL NOT! The venues hear smoke and they freak out. The other issue is knock off machines that are fog with regular ice, but still use fog juice. Those can rise in some instances. They can also leave an oily residue. If using a machine like the nimbus you can’t set off anything. If venue is close I would buy a few lbs of dry ice and show em really quick on a weekday.

FYI, don’t buy add ons in hopes people will ask for them… you buy them with the expectation that you have to MARKET & SELL it. My clients don’t ever ask for anything… 95% say send me your pricing. Then during the consultation they say the photos or videos of items look really cool, I want that! Many of them have never seen any of my effects before, so they would’ve never asked in their own.
 

DJ Ricky B

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NO IT WILL NOT! The venues hear smoke and they freak out. The other issue is knock off machines that are fog with regular ice, but still use fog juice. Those can rise in some instances. They can also leave an oily residue. If using a machine like the nimbus you can’t set off anything. If venue is close I would buy a few lbs of dry ice and show em really quick on a weekday.

FYI, don’t buy add ons in hopes people will ask for them… you buy them with the expectation that you have to MARKET & SELL it. My clients don’t ever ask for anything… 95% say send me your pricing. Then during the consultation they say the photos or videos of items look really cool, I want that! Many of them have never seen any of my effects before, so they would’ve never asked in their own.
Thank you for re assuring me. I just don't want to piss off a venue and some how cause alarms to go off after I tell them the effect will not mess with them.

I use to promote the dancing on clouds effect on my website years ago. I used the Chauvet promotional picture they gave DJs links to at the DJ expo in like 2013. I was offering it to every couple, and almost nobody expressed interest in it. Couples seemed to generally either not want it, or if they expressed interest, after I quoted them $250 for it, they didn't want to spend the money on it. I had two couples who were willing to add on a scaled down version of the effect for $75.00. I used a Low Lying Fogger, and dry ice to create a small effect. Not the scale of what the Nimbus would do, but the couple was happy with the results at the time.

This bride wants it, and has no problem paying well for the add on it seems. She wants to make it happen.
 

rickryan.com

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I own a Nimbus knock-off and have stuck it back in a corner. For my situation, it's too much trouble to fool with. I spend $40 in dry ice and that requires an hour trip to where they have it. Also, I can only get blocks of ice and those have to be broken up and that doesn't work with the basket (gaps too wide). It's a nice effect but my opinion you'll have to have a 2nd person to run it.
 

djtaso

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I own a Nimbus knock-off and have stuck it back in a corner. For my situation, it's too much trouble to fool with. I spend $40 in dry ice and that requires an hour trip to where they have it. Also, I can only get blocks of ice and those have to be broken up and that doesn't work with the basket (gaps too wide). It's a nice effect but my opinion you'll have to have a 2nd person to run it.
Yes you need a second person. And for the blocks, I’ve had to use it in the past. Just put them in a plastic bag and take a hammer at it and break it down. Works well, although pellet form is still the best.
 

rickryan.com

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Yes you need a second person. And for the blocks, I’ve had to use it in the past. Just put them in a plastic bag and take a hammer at it and break it down. Works well, although pellet form is still the best.
If I break up the blocks it goes to dust. The basket on my unit has openings that are too wide to use it. I thought about putting some screen material inside the basket but it just seemed like it was too much hassle so I've dropped it (for now).
 

djtaso

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If I break up the blocks it goes to dust. The basket on my unit has openings that are too wide to use it. I thought about putting some screen material inside the basket but it just seemed like it was too much hassle so I've dropped it (for now).
Just how much are you hammering lol? I break it up into 2 inch pieces
 

rickryan.com

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Just how much are you hammering lol? I break it up into 2 inch pieces
I put them in a plastic bags, whack it a few times and a lot of it goes to dust-size that will go thru the basket. I wish there was a source for pellets here locally but I'm having to drive 30 miles just to find blocks of dry ice.
 

Proformance

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NO IT WILL NOT!
That's not entirely true, and there are always other very important safety concerns associated with Dry Ice or Nitrogen systems.

If you are using a Nimbus type unit - then the likelihood is quite low, because the output is minimal. However, you still need to know what to look for to avoid that one situation that is different.

Even water vapor can trigger certain types of detectors, and if there are return air ducts at the floor level the dense vapor can be pulled directly into the commercial air system where certain types of air quality or smoke detectors might exist. It's a rare setup - but the point to remember is that smoke is not the only thing that can set off an alarm.

Another thing to watch out for is orchestra pits and other sunken floor areas in a venue. Even after he affect is no longer visible cold CO2 gas will settle to low areas and displace the breathable air. Worst case scenario would be a ballroom with an adjoining lower level setup for the children. The concentrated carbon dioxide has the potential to induce asphyxiation. It could very quietly render a child unconscious, or even induce death all while witnesses believe the child simply fell asleep!

Do not operate any of these machines where there is an infant at floor level in a carrier seat or car seat like accessory.

The point is - Dry Ice Fog is not inherently immune from safety issues. Do a site survey and conduct due diligence to avoid being THAT disc-jockey who ends up making national news for all the wrong reasons.
 
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sonic-vision

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PRO, stop being practical.
The other DJ from New Jersey will jump in and put us all on the right path soon.
 

djtaso

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That's not entirely true, and there are always other very important safety concerns associated with Dry Ice or Nitrogen systems.

If you are using a Nimbus type unit - then the likelihood is quite low, because the output is minimal. However, you still need to know what to look for to avoid that one situation that is different.

Even water vapor can trigger certain types of detectors, and if there are return air ducts at the floor level the dense vapor can be pulled directly into the commercial air system where certain types of air quality or smoke detectors might exist. It's a rare setup - but the point to remember is that smoke is not the only thing that can set off an alarm.

Another thing to watch out for is orchestra pits and other sunken floor areas in a venue. Even after he affect is no longer visible cold CO2 gas will settle to low areas and displace the breathable air. Worst case scenario would be a ballroom with an adjoining lower level setup for the children. The concentrated carbon dioxide has the potential to induce asphyxiation. It could very quietly render a child unconscious, or even induce death all while witnesses believe the child simply fell asleep!

Do not operate any of these machines where there is an infant at floor level in a carrier seat or car seat like accessory.

The point is - Dry Ice Fog is not inherently immune from safety issues. Do a site survey and conduct due diligence to avoid being THAT disc-jockey who ends up making national news for all the wrong reasons.
I’ve never been to or heard of a venue that’s above a different type of facility, especially one where children would be present. That would be a new one to me. Secondly, we always request that the ac/heat be turned off prior to the first dance (essentially it’s off by the time intros start). This way the effect looks right… so the air return in this case would not be operational.
 
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Proformance

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I’ve never been to or heard of a venue that’s above a different type of facility, especially one where children would be present. That would be a new one to me. Secondly, we always request that the ac/heat be turned off prior to the first dance (essentially it’s off by the time intros start). This way the effect looks right… so the air return in this case would not be operational.
LOL.
  • You're in NJ - and you've never been to a restaurant, bar, club, or hotel event space with a sunken lounge or adjacent area with a different floor level?
  • You do sweet sixteens and weddings but there's never any children present?
You can control AC and heat, but actual air handling equipment in certain designated event spaces is a code requirement that cannot be turned off.

The point is: "you don't know what you don't know" (i.e. the response indicates you've never even considered the architectural risks associated with dry ice.)

Know what to look for before you deploy it.
sunken loung.jpgsunken lounge.jpgsunken lounge 1.jpg

Offsets in floor level are a hazard to be evaluated even if they are on the other side of the entry doors. Know where the gas will go, where it might collect, and who or what might occupy that space during or shortly after deployment. High concentrations of C02 will be an invisible hazard to people and pets.

In most cases - it'll be fine. ...and then there's the one where it's NOT and you can't take it back.
 

djtaso

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LOL.
  • You're in NJ - and you've never been to a restaurant, bar, club, or hotel event space with a sunken lounge or adjacent area with a different floor level?
  • You do sweet sixteens and weddings but there's never any children present?
You can control AC and heat, but actual air handling equipment in certain designated event spaces is a code requirement that cannot be turned off.

The point is: "you don't know what you don't know" (i.e. the response indicates you've never even considered the architectural risks associated with dry ice.)

Know what to look for before you deploy it.
View attachment 53326View attachment 53327View attachment 53328

Offsets in floor level are a hazard to be evaluated even if they are on the other side of the entry doors. Know where the gas will go, where it might collect, and who or what might occupy that space during or shortly after deployment. High concentrations of C02 will be an invisible hazard to people and pets.

In most cases - it'll be fine. ...and then there's the one where it's NOT and you can't take it back.
I haven't seen what you've shown in any of the venues I've been in. Keep in mind, most of my events are done at venues specifically designed for weddings/private events. Very rarely is there a separate restaurant or bar area that you've mentioned, especially at an offset level. Hotel weddings here are considered low end, so not something I play at too often, but even there I haven't witnessed this.

As far as the ac, with it being off, the ability for those vapors to spread on their own and penetrate all those body's and reach the edges of the room where the returns may be is extremely unlikely, perhaps borderline impossible.

I've been in some historic buildings as well, where staff gets super nervous about setting off alarms... and when I show them the effect ahead of the wedding, nothing happens, and the cloud never even gets close to any of the sensors.

I mean, the reality is anything is possible anywhere... but we're talking about a .001% chance here... a speaker falling over and hitting someone has a higher rate of success. Actually a flash stand from a photographer has actually fallen over and hit someone in the head at a wedding I was at and caused some intense bleeding... but that's a story for a different time lol.
 

rickryan.com

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Bob is making some good points and while it's highly unlikely to happen, it's wise to take into account any POSSIBLE danger. I remember I always poo-poo'ed the notion of setting off fire alarms with a smoke machine............until it happened to me, which resulted in a hotel being cleared of all guests. Better safe than sorry.