Replacement lapel mic.

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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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I've never heard anyone call that a "CLG." We call that a "processor."
Obsolete in today's digital rigs.
 

Jeff Romard

Administrator
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Sep 4, 2006
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[/QUOTE]
I've never heard anyone call that a "CLG." We call that a "processor."
Obsolete in today's digital rigs.
That's because you are so much smarter than the rest of us. Us common folk call it a Compressor/ Limiter/ Gate or CLG for short and yes they are rarely used in DJ circles these days but alas there are still many sound people that still do. They still make and sell them I don't suppose it's just audio museums buying. Most studios still prefer the hardware also

Now back to my original statement

I agree and I'll take it one further giving someone equipment beyond their skill level can be a detriment to their performance. A CLG, or even a Crossover or EQ can make things really bad if you don't know how to use them
Regardless if it's hardware or on board not knowing how to use it can become problematic
 

Jeff Romard

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Your acronym I suppose, never heard anything other than "gated compressor/limiter (which would be "GCL" if your so inclined.)
Gating is always the first process in line, limiting the last.

Here's one you can add to you inventory: 2 Ch "CGL"
I don't particularly need one but thanks anyway Bobby

I guess maybe they say things different in Bawston than some other places. I've heard it referred to both ways and never felt the need to correct anyone does that make me worldly?



 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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I just call 'em as I see 'em.
That acronym doesn't even appear in any of the product links you posted. If it were in any way colloquial it would at least by now show up in a google search for "clg audio processor" including suppliers who rent or sell "CLG" but, it doesn't.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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I have to agree that the user of a certain piece of gear should know how to properly use it. If they don't that can cause problems. What does help is using really good gear to work with. Now for example using high quality speakers that sound great can make a big difference in the sound and how your performance goes. Now when someone compliments you on your performance they without realizing it are complimenting you on the gear you use. If your gear sucks people will notice it and that can cost you gigs. I've seen some that had great gear they were using but sucked at DJing the event. People left the events pissed off. It goes a long way when the DJ knows what event to agree to do because it's the right fit for them and they do a great job at the event. Those who agree to do an event that they are not the right fit to do the event just to make some money are called gig whores.
 

sawdust123

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Nov 10, 2006
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That doesn't just apply to DJs Mix. I saw Elvis Costello opening for Steely Dan at a 20K seat outdoor venue. The venue has a top of the line L-Acoustic line array that I have heard before and knew it sounded great. Elvis sounded like crap though. Between performers, I spoke to the venue staff sitting at the house position (which was not being for this show). They confirmed there was no problems with the array. The guy that sold the system to the venue was also at the show and he too agreed Elvis sounded like shit. Steely Dan came on a few minutes later and they sounded pristine. This made it clear that the mix engineer for Elvis was a hack. It was hard to believe both bands were using the same system.
 

sonic-vision

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Feb 6, 2007
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Openers generally don't sound as well as the head liners nor do the openers have the same lighting. From Notcho's posts ,I would say he is the opener. :embarrassed:
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,923
5,211
That doesn't just apply to DJs Mix. I saw Elvis Costello opening for Steely Dan at a 20K seat outdoor venue. The venue has a top of the line L-Acoustic line array that I have heard before and knew it sounded great. Elvis sounded like crap though. ...This made it clear that the mix engineer for Elvis was a hack. It was hard to believe both bands were using the same system.
The opening act generally does not use the same console as the headliner. The two consoles are separated by a matrix mixer. Costello may prefer a mix the rest us find wanting. They may not get a rehearsal or adequate setup. You can't blame the engineer without knowing the circumstances or situation. Lots of people higher up in the chain can throw wrenches into the works..

DJs don't typically have these other layers of constraint and are more transparent. There are some DJs that can pull a phoenix from the ashes and others who are just one minor inconvenience from a complete disaster. A lot of DJs can be quite thin on capability due to a lack of resources or broader exposure. They know their own personal piece of gear or software and nothing else. Just one little change or one defect and they are helpless. Compare that to say, a guitar or piano player whose talent is not wholly invested in a single retail item. They can easily move from one instrument to another despite any preference they may have. You don't see that level of technical capability very often with DJs, maybe 1 in 10 at best.

MIxmastermachom said:
Now when someone compliments you on your performance they without realizing it are complimenting you on the gear you use.
I don't think there's any hidden psychological meaning. People are pretty clear about when they are complimenting the DJ or liking the gear. When an issue does arise It's not that hard discern when a DJ is struggling with ability, a lack of resources, or just poor choices. There's usually no sound engineer you can blame. :)
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

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Oct 16, 2011
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That doesn't just apply to DJs Mix. I saw Elvis Costello opening for Steely Dan at a 20K seat outdoor venue. The venue has a top of the line L-Acoustic line array that I have heard before and knew it sounded great. Elvis sounded like crap though. Between performers, I spoke to the venue staff sitting at the house position (which was not being for this show). They confirmed there was no problems with the array. The guy that sold the system to the venue was also at the show and he too agreed Elvis sounded like shit. Steely Dan came on a few minutes later and they sounded pristine. This made it clear that the mix engineer for Elvis was a hack. It was hard to believe both bands were using the same system.
I can believe it. If you suck it doesn't matter how great the gear is. Like I said I've seen some who had top notch gear but truly sucked and that's not just my professional opinion but my personal one as well.

To be fair though anybody can have a bad time doing an event. Sometimes things just don't well for any one of us. Now the big thing is that it only happens occasionally. I had a bartender tell me I always do a great job. That wasn't true. Sometimes I did OK. The manager wanted me to play there on Friday and Saturday one weekend. The lounge decided to let another DJ come in on Friday. I got there on Saturday and heard what happened that Friday. The DJ was so bad that 30 people walked out the lounge and finally they stopped the DJ from playing and turned on the jukebox. When I got there was told I got to really come up because of what happened the night before. All I knew was I had to set my gear up, play music for the crowd, shut it down when it was time to and get paid. I was not worried about the lounge stopping me from playing and turning on the jukebox. When I played there I didn't always do a great job. I did a good enough job that nobody complained about my playing. So the people running the lounge liked what I did and that's why I got to play there many times when they needed a DJ to cover a night.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,710
1,730
63
The opening act generally does not use the same console as the headliner. The two consoles are separated by a matrix mixer. Costello may prefer a mix the rest us find wanting. They may not get a rehearsal or adequate setup. You can't blame the engineer without knowing the circumstances or situation. Lots of people higher up in the chain can throw wrenches into the works..

DJs don't typically have these other layers of constraint and are more transparent. There are some DJs that can pull a phoenix from the ashes and others who are just one minor inconvenience from a complete disaster. A lot of DJs can be quite thin on capability due to a lack of resources or broader exposure. They know their own personal piece of gear or software and nothing else. Just one little change or one defect and they are helpless. Compare that to say, a guitar or piano player whose talent is not wholly invested in a single retail item. They can easily move from one instrument to another despite any preference they may have. You don't see that level of technical capability very often with DJs, maybe 1 in 10 at best.



I don't think there's any hidden psychological meaning. People are pretty clear about when they are complimenting the DJ or liking the gear. When an issue does arise It's not that hard discern when a DJ is struggling with ability, a lack of resources, or just poor choices. There's usually no sound engineer you can blame. :)
When you have a ton of experience you should know how to read a crowd and trouble shoot issues that come up quickly.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,710
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What if we don't have a ton of experience? Are we not allowed to try?
Who gets to decide when someone can hire us?
Taso said one of the best things ever. He did his sisters wedding and if his family would have heard him when he first started out they would have said he was lousy. I worked hard at getting better. Part of it has to do with God given talent. Now no matter how much of that you have, you still have to put some serious work in if you want to be really good. Some just simply put were never meant to be a DJ. Just like I was never meant to be a singer. No matter how much I practiced at being a singer I would still suck big time and I know it!