Replacement lapel mic.

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Proformance

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Nov 6, 2006
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The speakers sounded ok (aside from wind noise), but his recording was bad.
The RCA tape output on the Behringer mixer is controlled by the Master Fader. Anything you do to adjust the sound going to your speakers will also change the audio at the tape outputs (level, EQ, filters, phase, etc) The tape outputs generally require a much higher output level than you would feed to your speakers for a ceremony.

The best way to feed a recorder is pre-fader so that the signal is sent at the full mix level independent of where the Live Master volume is set. The Berhinger doesn't have that capability but, you could use the FX send as an an auxilary mix bus to create a recording mix independent of the Master. This would allow you to dial in a higher level on the mic to a recorder without any change or risk of feedback in the live sound.
 

sawdust123

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If he was using the RCA pair to a 3.5mm camera input the maximum cable length for that is 20Ft after which significant low frequency loss will start to appear. It will vary from one quality of cable to another, but small gauge unbalanced cables are not a good choice for any kind of distance.
There is no scientific basis for this.

RCA stereo or dual mono pair direct to a balanced XLR camera input would wreck the signal because without a trans-formative device in between the two signal types are not compatible.
This is where the tinny sound problem lies. The video mostly likely had a mono balanced input and was being fed a stereo signal. The video input was looking for the difference signal between the tip and ring (or pins 2 and 3). The bass is mostly mono so it produces a common-mode signal on the left and right. The balanced input is designed to reject common mode signals (that is why we have the spec for common-mode rejection ratio). What is left is strictly the difference signal between the left and right channels. This would be VERY tinny.
 

dbstudios

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Based on this information, maybe my audio Technica wireless mic is fine, and could just use a wind screen. My handheld is an xlr mic, with an xvive wireless adapter, which I've had zero issues with.
 

sawdust123

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Based on this information, maybe my audio Technica wireless mic is fine, and could just use a wind screen. My handheld is an xlr mic, with an xvive wireless adapter, which I've had zero issues with.
And I would get a mono-summing adapter cable so you could feed the next videographer a proper signal. Note: A proper summing cable is NOT a "Y" cable. A summing cable has resistors in it so your stereo signal is mixed properly into a mono signal.
 

sonic-vision

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I plug video man into an XLR output from one of my speakers for ceremony & or reception.
I run mono sound & from the videos I have had the opportunity to watch the sound has been great.
wind noise is an issue by it's self. Technic ,Mic placement and quality do come into play to get a clean wind free feed.
 

Proformance

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There is no scientific basis for this.
No, just tinny sound.

This is where the tinny sound problem lies. The video mostly likely had a mono balanced input and was being fed a stereo signal.
Not at all. The OP has already noted that the recorder input was a 3.5mm microphone jack and the source was a pair of RCA line outputs in parallel with the already summed mono main output.

3.5 mm inputs on video field recorders are always UNBALANCED. They are also designed to provide Bias Power (3-5 volts) to a microphone source - specifically mics intended for DSLR or DVC field use. Care must be taken to properly configure them. Using an adapter cable alone may not be sufficient and we don't know if the videographer failed to properly match the output source to the input.

If it sounded good on the PA system and EQ had not been dialed up to compensate for poor speaker performance - then the problem of "tinny" sound at the recorder is most likely an impedance mismatch resulting in significantly weaker bass response.
 
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Proformance

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Nov 6, 2006
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Based on this information, maybe my audio Technica wireless mic is fine, and could just use a wind screen. My handheld is an xlr mic, with an xvive wireless adapter, which I've had zero issues with.
A wind screen is not your issue, there is probably already one in the lav (though an external one may help a little bit with the wind noise.) Definitely find out what kind of lav mic capsules you have, and learn to properly position them - that will make a thousand percent difference in EVERY situation you face.

I would leave the videographer's issue alone. The device you need to properly make that connection is sitting on my desk but, it costs more than your mic does. If the video guy relies on others for sound it's really his job to know how to reliably make that connection. As an A1 it's my job to take care of the press, or video guy's audio needs, but as a DJ - No. That's not a realistic expectation.

On the other hand, if DJs are selling audio coverage for ceremonies or other events then that does imply they are acting in the role of an A1 and might be expected to provide more than just sound to their own PA. You'll have to figure that out and decide how to best proceed, Typically, your feed would be in addition to his own source, but for some events that's not possible. Just be careful when saying things like "I provide audio coverage for ceremony..." because the range of that responsibility means different things to different people.

.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

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Huh????????????
Not the mic itself. The fact of what you buy next doesn't cut in and out. It works flawlessly not causing a problem. That will help in your client and their guest appreciating the job you did. If there are major problems with that people will tend to frown at you.
 

PhaseIIPro

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Not the mic itself. The fact of what you buy next doesn't cut in and out. It works flawlessly not causing a problem. That will help in your client and their guest appreciating the job you did. If there are major problems with that people will tend to frown at you.

You totally missed the point, a good or great mic WON’T get you more work.
 
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dbstudios

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I think I might stick with my current setup for now, maybe I will over reacted when the videographer had his issues. My may wedding will allow me to try again.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

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You totally missed the point, a good or great mic WON’T get you more work.
What I was talking about is that having good equipment goes a long way with your performance and can help with people giving you plenty of compliments. Which in turn can lead to more work. Now no matter how great the equipment is, if the user doesn't know what to do with the equipment it won't matter how great the equipment is.
 

Proformance

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What I was talking about is that having good equipment goes a long way with your performance and can help with people giving you plenty of compliments.
That's not really true because there's an awful lot of DJs using equipment with features beyond their own capability. They simply like the look of all those light up buttons and trigger pads. A compliment is not a booking.

Then there's guys who have a phenomenal talent as emcee and leading the dance floor. They can knock it out of the park with just an iPod. They leave with commitments not just compliments.
 

Jeff Romard

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That's not really true because there's an awful lot of DJs using equipment with features beyond their own capability. They simply like the look of all those light up buttons and trigger pads. A compliment is not a booking.
I agree and I'll take it one further giving someone equipment beyond their skill level can be a detriment to their performance. A CLG, or even a Crossover or EQ can make things really bad if you don't know how to use them