My partner is something else.

ittigger

Hundred Acre Industry Icon
Feb 1, 2011
13,273
Western Maryland
Not sure why you're getting irate with me - this was brought up around Post 250. Here we are at Post 280 and now you're getting upset? Any client can have demands.

As for the event itself, did you read that you probably could have catered somewhat to what the client asked for without going to extremes. I never said it was your fault that things didn't go well ... but you may want to reread that thread for some helpful tips on how to prevent a re-occurrence. As for blame, you seem to be blaming your client and your partner, like you had nothing to do with it.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
1,151
60
Not sure why you're getting irate with me - this was brought up around Post 250. Here we are at Post 280 and now you're getting upset? Any client can have demands.

As for the event itself, did you read that you probably could have catered somewhat to what the client asked for without going to extremes. I never said it was your fault that things didn't go well ... but you may want to reread that thread for some helpful tips on how to prevent a re-occurrence. As for blame, you seem to be blaming your client and your partner, like you had nothing to do with it.
Not my partner. I blamed her for how things turned out. Again the style of music she wanted didn't fit that moment. That wasn't a time to look to get a bunch of people on the dance floor. That stuff should have been saved till after a lot of people had eaten and then time to crank it up and get people on the dance floor. I stand by what I said then and still now.

Like I said we both knew what she wanted would have a lot of people leaving, which it did just that. What do you do? Get on the microphone and announce I know this is the wrong music for right now but this is what so and so wants. LOL Like I said no need to get into a confrontation with the client over what they want even though you know it's wrong because of your years of experience and them not being a DJ.

My big issue is that it made us look bad. Nobody's going to blame her. They are going to look at you the DJ and blame you. They are going to look at you and think to themselves that DJ doesn't know what they are doing.
 

Jeff Romard

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 4, 2006
12,549
49
Sydney, Nova Scotia
Not my partner. I blamed her for how things turned out. Again the style of music she wanted didn't fit that moment. That wasn't a time to look to get a bunch of people on the dance floor. That stuff should have been saved till after a lot of people had eaten and then time to crank it up and get people on the dance floor. I stand by what I said then and still now.

Like I said we both knew what she wanted would have a lot of people leaving, which it did just that. What do you do? Get on the microphone and announce I know this is the wrong music for right now but this is what so and so wants. LOL Like I said no need to get into a confrontation with the client over what they want even though you know it's wrong because of your years of experience and them not being a DJ.

My big issue is that it made us look bad. Nobody's going to blame her. They are going to look at you the DJ and blame you. They are going to look at you and think to themselves that DJ doesn't know what they are doing.
"Ladies and Gentleman welcome to Bob's pay as you go Birthday party the musical selections were well thought out by Tammy Bo Bamy for your listening pleasure enjoy your dinner and make sure you buy an even split"
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
1,151
60
"Ladies and Gentleman welcome to Bob's pay as you go Birthday party the musical selections were well thought out by Tammy Bo Bamy for your listening pleasure enjoy your dinner and make sure you buy an even split"
That's a great suggestion and thanks. Now how do you keep people from leaving the event like those people did?

Let me say this so things are better understood. In the beginning my partner played classic disco music like My Love Is Free and other things like that. So when it was time for dinner music the crowd should have gotten a little break from that while they were eating. They didn't get that. She wanted house music. So the crowd never got a break from dance music the whole 4 hours.

What I thought I was going to be able to do was get some good pictures and video to use to show to potential clients. What I got was nothing worth showing to anybody. Basically I got a dead end.
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,660
32
NJ
www.djtaso.com
That's a great suggestion and thanks. Now how do you keep people from leaving the event like those people did?

Let me say this so things are better understood. In the beginning my partner played classic disco music like My Love Is Free and other things like that. So when it was time for dinner music the crowd should have gotten a little break from that while they were eating. They didn't get that. She wanted house music. So the crowd never got a break from dance music the whole 4 hours.

What I thought I was going to be able to do was get some good pictures and video to use to show to potential clients. What I got was nothing worth showing to anybody. Basically I got a dead end.
Mix there is nothing wrong with playing house music during dinner. I’ve done it at weddings wedding during dinner, as well as many of my cocktail hours (actually about half of my cocktail hours incorporate house music halfway through to get people ready to party)... did people leave... absolutely not. The key is to play it at the right volume, where it keeps people in an upbeat mood, but are still able to talk to the person next to them. It is the clients event... your job is to bring it to life as best as possible. If you interpreted house music as being super loud full volume that’s your fault. You could’ve eased into it picking the volume up with each song to get back to a dancing vibe as people were finishing up, since dinner had clearly started by the time she cake up you and asked.

Personally I don’t think people left because of the house music... that’s silly... they left because there was nothing more worth staying for after dinner probably.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
1,151
60
Taso please hear me out. This was a retirement celebration and the lady being honored my guess was easily over 60. So a lot of people there were older people. Originally I did think it was my partners fault until he explained things. The script was written out and she decided to change the script.

What I'm saying is there should have been some music played for the older people to enjoy as well and not just one type of music. I say while they were eating would have been a great time to play music that the older people would enjoy. 20-30 minutes of that while they were eating and after that make the announcement about being there to help celebrate the person that is retiring. Have people clap for the person retiring and then get on the microphone and ask people loudly are they ready to get the party started. Make the time for people to get out on the dance floor a big build up.

Of course not everybody's going to get out on the dance floor but certainly the majority of the people if done right should have been on the dance floor having a good time.

So the whole 4 hours of music was classic Disco and house music. Nothing in between that. That's not what discussed but that's how things turned out due to her changing things in the middle of the event.
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,660
32
NJ
www.djtaso.com
Taso please hear me out. This was a retirement celebration and the lady being honored my guess was easily over 60. So a lot of people there were older people. Originally I did think it was my partners fault until he explained things. The script was written out and she decided to change the script.

What I'm saying is there should have been some music played for the older people to enjoy as well and not just one type of music. I say while they were eating would have been a great time to play music that the older people would enjoy. 20-30 minutes of that while they were eating and after that make the announcement about being there to help celebrate the person that is retiring. Have people clap for the person retiring and then get on the microphone and ask people loudly are they ready to get the party started. Make the time for people to get out on the dance floor a big build up.

Of course not everybody's going to get out on the dance floor but certainly the majority of the people if done right should have been on the dance floor having a good time.

So the whole 4 hours of music was classic Disco and house music. Nothing in between that. That's not what discussed but that's how things turned out due to her changing things in the middle of the event.
When I go to sweet 16’s the music is anything but what adults want to be hearing for 4-5hrs. They don’t leave early though. People don’t leave a private party just bc you played a song or two that they didn’t like during dinner. Perhaps you simply played too loud and created an uncomfortable environment.
 
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Jeff Romard

Administrator
Staff member
Sep 4, 2006
12,549
49
Sydney, Nova Scotia
That's a great suggestion and thanks. Now how do you keep people from leaving the event like those people did?
Where is it any of your business that they leave or stay. You get paid the same for an empty or full room. It's a great night when you can open the dance floor to a big crowd and rock the place it's a wonderful high for me but at the end of the day you are being paid by the client to provide a service. You've laid your disclaimer so provide the service. If you feel it's "ruining your rep" then don't take the gig

While it may not have been the optimal music for the moment it can be done if done correctly. I have 15 or so dinner playlists I commonly use many of them are similar but they all create a slightly different feel. They all have some traditional dinner music and some toe tappers in there and some very light rock/yacht rock. There's rarely a night I play one of those lists that I don't get comments on the flow or style of the music

I also had another night where the client wanted ALL Artie Shaw for dinner music. Bluntly put 2 hours of Artie Shaw sucks but the client was so pleased I'd do it she gave me a $200 tip

Not playing the style the client wants would be like hiring someone to clean your carpets and they wash your van instead

When I go to sweet 16’s the music is anything but what adults want to be hearing for 4-5hrs. They don’t leave early though. People don’t leave a private party just bc you played a song or two that they didn’t like during dinner. Perhaps you simply played too loud and created an uncomfortable environment.
Or it might be the fact that a good portion of that crowd he had were in their 60's and 70's. I don't know what things are like in Jersey but generally around here there is a mass exodus of old folks after dinner at many events
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,660
32
NJ
www.djtaso.com
Where is it any of your business that they leave or stay. You get paid the same for an empty or full room. It's a great night when you can open the dance floor to a big crowd and rock the place it's a wonderful high for me but at the end of the day you are being paid by the client to provide a service. You've laid your disclaimer so provide the service. If you feel it's "ruining your rep" then don't take the gig

While it may not have been the optimal music for the moment it can be done if done correctly. I have 15 or so dinner playlists I commonly use many of them are similar but they all create a slightly different feel. They all have some traditional dinner music and some toe tappers in there and some very light rock/yacht rock. There's rarely a night I play one of those lists that I don't get comments on the flow or style of the music

I also had another night where the client wanted ALL Artie Shaw for dinner music. Bluntly put 2 hours of Artie Shaw sucks but the client was so pleased I'd do it she gave me a $200 tip

Not playing the style the client wants would be like hiring someone to clean your carpets and they wash your van instead



Or it might be the fact that a good portion of that crowd he had were in their 60's and 70's. I don't know what things are like in Jersey but generally around here there is a mass exodus of old folks after dinner at many events
In northern Nj and most of NYC the timelines are created slightly differently than the rest of the country. The cue to leave wouldn’t be until once the cake is presented along with dessert, and that is done around 1-1.5hrs before the end of the night. Rarely do guests leave before then. We do dancing before dinner, as well as after. It’s more choppy but it’s what they’re used to, as they don’t want to wait until dinner is done to dance.

Now I don’t know about mix’s event, as it looks like it was self catered and they ran their own timeline. So it’s very likely that dinner ran late and people wanted to get home. I was just pointing out that the music was probably not the reason (as you said anything can work), unless perhaps they were blasting it during dinner.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
1,151
60
When I go to sweet 16’s the music is anything but what adults want to be hearing for 4-5hrs. They don’t leave early though. People don’t leave a private party just bc you played a song or two that they didn’t like during dinner. Perhaps you simply played too loud and created an uncomfortable environment.
The music that was played the whole 4 hours was Disco from back in the day and house music. It wasn't supposed to go that way but with the change that she made it turned out that way. I did say some stuff needed to be for the older people there attending the event to enjoy as well. I wouldn't play all oldies unless that was the type of event it was.

I did say 20-30 minutes of music that the older people would enjoy. Just enough to tease them with.