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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,054
4,408
It's not necessarily an indicator of the file quality on the original CD itself.
Not true.
Early on, manufacturers could not digitally remaster the back catalogs of record labels fast enough to keep up with the growing demand for CDs. They could however, make a ton of revenue on compulsory licensing which essentially allowed others to create and distribute new CDs of previously released material. In addition, similar CDs produced in Europe and China also made their way into our markets. A lot of these hastily produced CDs were mastered from questionable source material - including vinyl records and cassette.

If you grab some Greatest Hits discs by classic artists - you'll inevitably hear some that contain the pops, clicks, wow, and rumble of a vinyl record. An easy find in this category is "Chubby Checker's Greatest Hits." At one time I owned as many as 10 different varieties of this title - only 5 of which were actually "Digitally Remastered" and took up permanent residence in my mobile music libraries.

As for the OP - he's referring to tracks purchased and downloaded online. The sampling rate for these is typically set by the distributor.
 

Albatross

DJ Extraordinaire
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Sep 7, 2016
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Not true.
Early on, manufacturers could not digitally remaster the back catalogs of record labels fast enough to keep up with the growing demand for CDs. They could however, make a ton of revenue on compulsory licensing which essentially allowed others to create and distribute new CDs of previously released material. In addition, similar CDs produced in Europe and China also made their way into our markets. A lot of these hastily produced CDs were mastered from questionable source material - including vinyl records and cassette.

If you grab some Greatest Hits discs by classic artists - you'll inevitably hear some that contain the pops, clicks, wow, and rumble of a vinyl record. An easy find in this category is "Chubby Checker's Greatest Hits." At one time I owned as many as 10 different varieties of this title - only 5 of which were actually "Digitally Remastered" and took up permanent residence in my mobile music libraries.

As for the OP - he's referring to tracks purchased and downloaded online. The sampling rate for these is typically set by the distributor.
He's talking about file size. If I rip a poor quality recording of Chubby Checker at 320 kbps, it's still 320. I'll have all the crackles and pops in very high fidelity. It's not going to improve sound, but it's just a measure of how much of the original data is being passed along.

And I read that he was comparing that file size of a ripped CD to what he downloads from Spotify.

So I don't doubt that you're right and poor quality CDs exist, but I don't really think that's the point.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,054
4,408
Separate locations addresses COOP - Continuity Of Operations. Having all your backups in the same physical location will be disastrous in the event of a fire, flood or other.
This isn't that big of an issue with professional DJs because a music collection (on HD, CDs, or other material storage) is no longer necessary to doing the job. The possibility of DJing entirely by subscription already exists independent of how secure anyone may or may not feel about it.

Personally, I have multiple HD copies that address NOOP - Nuisance Of Operations. These are instances of: dropping, losing, theft, failure, or aging, of a hard drive.

I can mitigate fire and water damage by using an appropriate safe. Regardless, the state of the DJ trade is such that if I lost my entire collection to a disaster I would not see a need to replace it.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,054
4,408
He's talking about file size. If I rip a poor quality recording of Chubby Checker at 320 kbps, it's still 320. I'll have all the crackles and pops in very high fidelity. It's not going to improve sound, but it's just a measure of how much of the original data is being passed along.

And I read that he was comparing that file size of a ripped CD to what he downloads from Spotify.

So I don't doubt that you're right and poor quality CDs exist, but I don't really think that's the point.
Arguing high resolution rips of shitty source material isn't your best look.
And NO... you are not correct because the more distortion and unwanted artifacts contained in the original - the less reliable the algorithm will be. A CD ripper is not exercising the same level of discrimination that our brain can. It is an approximation that relies on the input being of sufficient fidelity as not to mask the desired sounds with unwanted artifacts. Ripping is not error free - even at higher bit rates.

When you download a song online you may be without any disclosure about it's mastering source, or fidelity. The bit rate really doesn't amount to a hill of beasn
 

Albatross

DJ Extraordinaire
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Sep 7, 2016
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Arguing high resolution rips of shitty source material isn't your best look.
What are you talking about? I'm not recommending this strategy, or even saying anything at all about the quality of the rip algorithm. I'm simply saying that a CD ripped at 125 kbps is not an indication of the quality of the original file. It's possible to rip a high quality recording at poor quality, or a low quality recording at high quality.

What look do you think I'm showing that isn't good?
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,054
4,408
It's possible to rip a high quality recording at poor quality, or a low quality recording at high quality.

What look do you think I'm showing that isn't good?
That one - right there. It's probably the most useless assertion I've heard
 
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B-Sharp

DJ Extraordinaire
Feb 9, 2008
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Taunton MA
www.southcoastdj.com
The reason i ask is i have transferred a song from a CD to my external hard drive and it was 125 kbps and when taken the same song from spotify its at 225 kbps and to me they sound the same.
How are you certain that the same song from Spotify is 225 kbps? Spotify's streaming bitrate is usually 96 kbps on its normal quality setting, 160 kbps on its high quality setting, and 320 kbps on its very high settings (available only if you have Spotify premium).

I think the giveaway here is that you said "taken the same song from Spotify"... if you're using some sort of website or recorder to rip a song from Spotify, it's probably that website or software that's converting the bitrate to 225 kbps regardless. Often, this is done by converter websites just to trick the end-user into thinking they're getting a high-quality file. If they gave you a 96 kbps file, you'd be unimpressed with it based on just that spec.
 
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Albatross

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That one - right there. It's probably the most useless assertion I've heard
Noted. You think that it's more relevant that we all know how many copies of a Chubby Checker tune you used to own than to understand the distinction that file size and file quality are not always directly linked. Good addition as always! :soldierbravo:
 

ittigger

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Feb 1, 2011
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This isn't that big of an issue with professional DJs because a music collection (on HD, CDs, or other material storage) is no longer necessary to doing the job. The possibility of DJing entirely by subscription already exists independent of how secure anyone may or may not feel about it.

Personally, I have multiple HD copies that address NOOP - Nuisance Of Operations. These are instances of: dropping, losing, theft, failure, or aging, of a hard drive.

I can mitigate fire and water damage by using an appropriate safe. Regardless, the state of the DJ trade is such that if I lost my entire collection to a disaster I would not see a need to replace it.
NOOP .. good one. Unfortunately, there is no such thing that applies to business. COOP is an actual business area which covers dropping, losing, theft, failure or aging of a hard drive - as well as fire, water and other things. Mitigating fire and water by using a safe may be in your plans for a COOP .. but anyone in their right mind will tell you that is not a good plan. Having a safe certainly can help - but it is by no means part of a COOP. If you want to ensure that your media has the potential to burn, then it's a great plan.

DJ by subscription .. if you're referring to using online streaming media, you've been given plenty of examples over time of how this is not dependable, regardless of how secure you may or may not feel about it. As usual, your mileage does vary.
 
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dunlopj

DJ Extraordinaire
Aug 14, 2008
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Belair MD
Separate locations addresses COOP - Continuity Of Operations. Having all your backups in the same physical location will be disastrous in the event of a fire, flood or other.
I was just gonna mention that. What good are multiple backups if they're all together in ONE location? A fire breaks out and they're ALL DOA.

PLEASE...keep them in SEPARATE locations.
 

steve149

Shine on you crazy diamond
Staff member
ODJT Supporter
Sep 26, 2011
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Connecticut
NOOP .. good one. Unfortunately, there is no such thing that applies to business. COOP is an actual business area which covers dropping, losing, theft, failure or aging of a hard drive - as well as fire, water and other things. Mitigating fire and water by using a safe may be in your plans for a COOP .. but anyone in their right mind will tell you that is not a good plan. Having a safe certainly can help - but it is by no means part of a COOP. If you want to ensure that your media has the potential to burn, then it's a great plan.

DJ by subscription .. if you're referring to using online streaming media, you've been given plenty of examples over time of how this is not dependable, regardless of how secure you may or may not feel about it. As usual, your mileage does vary.
Actually, if I had to, I could DJ strictly from a streaming service. Since most allow you to offline sync 1000+ songs, it wouldn't be tough to carry a high percentage of standard material .. plus any event specific stuff. So, even if you lose internet, one could pull off many events.
 

steve149

Shine on you crazy diamond
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Agreed - by streaming, I meant relying on a wifi/remote connection.
As streaming services offer better caching, they become very similar to a pool. I agree it would be dangerous to assume instant internet access, but it's getting better .. and the benefit is one can sync multiple devices pretty simply. Now, if they can work on their TOSs ... :)
 

ittigger

Hundred Acre Industry Icon
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Feb 1, 2011
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As streaming services offer better caching, they become very similar to a pool. I agree it would be dangerous to assume instant internet access, but it's getting better .. and the benefit is one can sync multiple devices pretty simply. Now, if they can work on their TOSs ... :)
In a metro area, I pretty much agree - though there are still lots of areas with barely any access. In the country, not so much.
 
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steve149

Shine on you crazy diamond
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Sep 26, 2011
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In a metro area, I pretty much agree - though there are still lots of areas with barely any access. In the country, not so much.
Yea, but if you sync at home it's not a lot different than bringing CDs or MP3s regardless of where you are.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,054
4,408
NOOP .. good one. Unfortunately, there is no such thing that applies to business. COOP is an actual business area which covers dropping, losing, theft, failure or aging of a hard drive - as well as fire, water and other things. Mitigating fire and water by using a safe may be in your plans for a COOP .. but anyone in their right mind will tell you that is not a good plan. Having a safe certainly can help - but it is by no means part of a COOP. If you want to ensure that your media has the potential to burn, then it's a great plan.

DJ by subscription .. if you're referring to using online streaming media, you've been given plenty of examples over time of how this is not dependable, regardless of how secure you may or may not feel about it. As usual, your mileage does vary.
It's amazing how much goes right over your head.