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Albatross

DJ Extraordinaire
ODJT Supporter
Sep 7, 2016
2,871
7,504
I just want to find out how to add my business page to google. I went on Youtube and it talked about adding it to a website instead of a business page to google.
You shouldn't need to add it to Google. Google literally scans the entire internet for pages to add. When you search Google for your company it already comes up.

Screenshot_20220628-152557.png
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
8,028
5,285
If you do weddings, you're dealing with younger gen z/millennial aged buyers, and they're very visual/emotional based buyers. They're natural instincts are, even when it's a recommendation is to find their social media and web site and get a better feel for them before contacting. They're also likely to contact other dj's and therefore have multiple tabs open sending out inquiries and researching... if you don't have a site, they're unlikely to go out of their way to contact you when they've already contacted 5-10 other dj's. The only time I see a different experience is when they've seen you in person and are adamant about having you... but even then if they reach out direct, its 90% through text or instagram dm's. In addition, this age group is the least likely to initiate a phone call or hold on to a business card... further proving the importance of an online presence. Granted this is strictly weddings... corporate events, or events where the point of contact is an event planner or venue is different. The only time I get phone calls out of the blue are from people 40+ or from other businesses. I can't recall the last time I got a call for a wedding to initiate the inquiry process.
Your experience belies your own age. You're business didn't exist before the internet and hence you're presenting as a conclusion what is simply the result of steering, a detour installed by method.

If our practice is web-centric then web based interaction is the result. If our practice is reputation based then our interaction is face-to-face and by telephone. I NEVER refer someone to a website if I already have them on the phone, it's counter-productive. Email replaces the postal service but the internet has not replaced public relations.
 
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djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,471
9,201
35
NJ
www.djtaso.com
Your experience belies your own age. You're business didn't exist before the internet and hence you're presenting as a conclusion what is simply the result of steering, a detour installed by method.

If our practice is web-centric then web based interaction is the result. If our practice is reputation based then our interaction is face-to-face and by telephone. I NEVER refer someone to a website if I already have them on the phone, it's counter-productive. Email replaces the postal service but the internet has not replaced public relations.
My business began in 2004... I didn't have a website until 2016. All I'm discussing is the natural method of communication preferred by the average millennial. No steering, no result of what our practices are... rather a social change that has occurred whether we want it to or not. You're right... why would you refer them to a website if you have them on the phone.... the dilemma with that though is that you're highly unlikely to get the typical millennial on the phone FIRST. My wife HATES calling ANYONE. If there's an issue with an order... she'd rather deal with it via email, even if it takes days to resolve via the back and forth, where a phone call would resolve everything in less than an hour.

The reality is the initial point of contact is online... even if it is to find your number (for a new client, not a repeat client). As you're probably aware, my business is almost all referral based (My marketing expenses have been ZERO for years now)... of the 60 events booked for 2022... all but 7 are either past clients, referrals from past clients, or referrals from people that have experienced my services. You can't say that's not reputation based. Almost all have initiated their inquiry by visiting my site, emailing me direct, or texting me asking for a date (of the 250 inquiries for 2022, right around 200 began through my website). It's not because I designed it that way... in fact my number is everywhere for people to find... it's because couples prefer not to begin their experience by phone. To take it one step further... couples more and more are preferring to receive information first (which is why I send all my pricing, videos, photos, and faqs up front), and then after they make sure what you offer is in line with what they're seeking, they will schedule the consultation by phone or video. In fact, I'm seeing more and more couples putting in the inquiry notes that thy prefer communication by email.

You have a very different target market and business model. You're more corporate and non-wedding based. I've never had a venue book me... but again I'm 80% weddings, and of the school events I do, the students or a teacher will inquire first who behave differently than a venue/corporate contact. Most wedding clients inquire at 2 points of the day... afternoons while they're at work... or late at night when they're done with all their work and doing wedding research together (I can't tell you how many inquiries I receive around midnight)... both times are inappropriate for a phone call.

It's not a right or wrong, it's an adaptation that's needed based on your market, your clientele, and the solutions they seek. Mix may be experiencing a shift in audience or a shift in their expectations from a dj service. As a result... he'll need to adapt if he wants a chance at reaching those clients. You can't force them to get on the phone with you and spend 10 minutes talking if they're against that.

One last note... the inquiries that come in via my website are SIGNIFICANTLY more qualified than those calling. The inquiries initiated by phone have no clue about my pricing or level of service I offer... they just got my name from a friend or searched for a local dj and did no research. The ones coming in through my site saw my pricing and what my services are like and were qualified before they even inquired. Pricing is rarely an issue.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
8,028
5,285
You're simply talking about a reality you've created for yourself by your own choices.There's no broad application here to "millennials" or any other group. Your communications are web centric because that is the door you choose to leave open - You're not so much "qualifying" customers as you are phishing for a response from a discreet profile.

Mix's age is the single most significant factor impacting his potential DJ work. A website will not be an effective way to deal with that.
 
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djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,471
9,201
35
NJ
www.djtaso.com
You're simply talking about a reality you've created for yourself by your own choices.There's no broad application here to "millennials" or any other group. Your communications are web centric because that is the door you choose to leave open - You're not so much "qualifying" customers as you are phishing for a response from a discreet profile.

Mix's age is the single most significant factor impacting his potential DJ work. A website will not be an effective way to deal with that.
Again not following how you can say I left open a web centric door as the only means of communication. For 12 years my primary, and virtually only, form of inquiry was my phone. My number is out there and has been shared for over a decade, and is also very easily attainable via Google or social media. I didn’t change my clients behavior… the clientele evolved. Most notably, as my wedding brand and clientele grew, the inquiries became more web based. That’s just the nature of weddings and that age group. As I mentioned, other types of parties have different norms, especially events like mitzvahs or sweet 16’s with older hosts who perhaps may be more inclined to call.

Keep in mind… I also get 250 or so inquiries a year… there’s no way I can handle all those calls coming in randomly, while scheduling finalizations and other meetings. My consultations are 30-60 minutes long… I only schedule those with the most qualified of potential clients. The ones that have seen my pricing, know the type of events I put on, and now want to make sure I’m the right person for the job. I’m not gonna talk for an hour (200+ times over), only to find out they had an $800 budget.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,910
1,806
64
I do agree about the age thing for me. I just turned 64. For some clients I'm too old to do an event for them. In some cases I'm older then their father.
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
8,028
5,285
I do agree about the age thing for me. I just turned 64. For some clients I'm too old to do an event for them. In some cases I'm older then their father.
Which is why the web isn't a good marketing fit for you. You need to rely on your interpersonal assets with people whose events are something you can connect on and agree with respect to how it should be handled. TRUST not hype is what will get you hired.

This means it's YOU who has to reach out the relevant leads and organizations, and do the footwork necessary to connect. This is totally different than throwing up a web page to wish and hope that that the right person happens to land on it.
 
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djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,471
9,201
35
NJ
www.djtaso.com
Maybe you could cut your talking points back to a more reasonable 15 minute. :)
Lol I wish... but it's not how my consultations really play out. Consultations are more of a question and answer opportunity for couples to ask anything that is of interest to them. It's not a sales pitch or a structured presentation. For example... here was today's consultation that lasted 50 minutes:

- Groom is a friend of a past couple from 6 yrs ago so spent a few minutes chit chatting about random stuff.
- Turn thing over to couple to ask any questions that are of concern to them... which were the following:

- So the venue offers their own uplighting and dancefloor lighting... but from your videos it seems that the last couple chose yours... is there a difference? This answer takes time as you gotta break down uplighting vs dancefloor lighting capabilities and control capabilities.

- We have a diverse range of ages and backgrounds... how do you handle that and can we give you requests? I have a very specific approach when dealing with requests and cultural elements, and personally I think my approach is one of the reasons that makes me stand out. It's not a simple yes or no question.

- I noticed in your pricing info you highly suggest staged sparkler photos, what do you mean by that? Straight forward answer

- We've been to weddings in the past where the DJ plays songs for too long and things get boring, is this something that all dj's do or is there anyway we can play just the best parts of the song? I explain my club background, my quick mix style, and the benefits of it and how it's appreciated by my couples and takes the energy to a higher level with the right crowd.

- If we want to work with a saxophonist or other live instrument, how does that work between the two of you and do you have any recommendations? Explain how they're tied into my sound system, monitor their levels, can provide referrals etc.

- When do we meet to go over the music and formalities? This is a longer answer as I have to explain how I utilize an online planner for them, as well as talk about the planning process, when we hold the finalization meeting and what we cover, when all the info is due, and the final call the week of to run through everything one final time.

- We may be having an after party... is that something you can do and how does that work/how much does it cost? Breakdown how the pricing works, how I have multiple systems and that one will be ready to go once the reception is over, and how my assistant will be getting music going there as we're playing the last song for the reception to create a seamless experience. In their case I also told them exactly where the dj would be set up and how they arrange the room so they can visualize it better since I had done it before there.

- When you were mentioning formalities... how do we know when we're supposed to do what... is this something that we're supposed to tell you or is that something the venue does? Talk about how we customize a timeline to their needs, then relay that proposed timeline to the venue and other vendors to make sure everyone is on same page (for example, do the photographers need to pull you for nighttime photos).

-So if we want to move forward, how do we do that? Explain to them the contract and retainer payment requirements as well as how the final payment is taken care of.

- Do we need to decide the package items now... we're still not sure what we really want, but we know we want to book you and secure you: Tell them the benefits of working with me means nothing is subcontracted so I don't need to contact others to hold things, nor do I have other dj's that will use my inventory of items and they can add items at a later date (couples LOVE this, as most other companies pressure to add things at time of booking with no option to change their minds).

Keep in mind within each question there are follow up questions or clarifications needed specific to their needs or expectations. We also do sidetrack here and there, but I feel those random side conversations create a better connection and relationship between me and my couples. Couples love the time spent and the dedication in hearing them out. The one consistent comment I receive is that my conversation was the most informative and exciting conversation they had with any vendor.
 

dunlopj

DJ Extraordinaire
Aug 14, 2008
5,965
6,890
63
Belair MD
Lol I wish... but it's not how my consultations really play out. Consultations are more of a question and answer opportunity for couples to ask anything that is of interest to them. It's not a sales pitch or a structured presentation. For example... here was today's consultation that lasted 50 minutes:
Wow...what a well worded answer! Y'all takin' notes here?:cheers:
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
8,028
5,285
Lol I wish... but it's not how my consultations really play out. Consultations are more of a question and answer opportunity for couples to ask anything that is of interest to them. It's not a sales pitch or a structured presentation. For example... here was today's consultation that lasted 50 minutes:

- Groom is a friend of a past couple from 6 yrs ago so spent a few minutes chit chatting about random stuff.
- Turn thing over to couple to ask any questions that are of concern to them... which were the following:

- So the venue offers their own uplighting and dancefloor lighting... but from your videos it seems that the last couple chose yours... is there a difference? This answer takes time as you gotta break down uplighting vs dancefloor lighting capabilities and control capabilities.

- We have a diverse range of ages and backgrounds... how do you handle that and can we give you requests? I have a very specific approach when dealing with requests and cultural elements, and personally I think my approach is one of the reasons that makes me stand out. It's not a simple yes or no question.

- I noticed in your pricing info you highly suggest staged sparkler photos, what do you mean by that? Straight forward answer

- We've been to weddings in the past where the DJ plays songs for too long and things get boring, is this something that all dj's do or is there anyway we can play just the best parts of the song? I explain my club background, my quick mix style, and the benefits of it and how it's appreciated by my couples and takes the energy to a higher level with the right crowd.

- If we want to work with a saxophonist or other live instrument, how does that work between the two of you and do you have any recommendations? Explain how they're tied into my sound system, monitor their levels, can provide referrals etc.

- When do we meet to go over the music and formalities? This is a longer answer as I have to explain how I utilize an online planner for them, as well as talk about the planning process, when we hold the finalization meeting and what we cover, when all the info is due, and the final call the week of to run through everything one final time.

- We may be having an after party... is that something you can do and how does that work/how much does it cost? Breakdown how the pricing works, how I have multiple systems and that one will be ready to go once the reception is over, and how my assistant will be getting music going there as we're playing the last song for the reception to create a seamless experience. In their case I also told them exactly where the dj would be set up and how they arrange the room so they can visualize it better since I had done it before there.

- When you were mentioning formalities... how do we know when we're supposed to do what... is this something that we're supposed to tell you or is that something the venue does? Talk about how we customize a timeline to their needs, then relay that proposed timeline to the venue and other vendors to make sure everyone is on same page (for example, do the photographers need to pull you for nighttime photos).

-So if we want to move forward, how do we do that? Explain to them the contract and retainer payment requirements as well as how the final payment is taken care of.

- Do we need to decide the package items now... we're still not sure what we really want, but we know we want to book you and secure you: Tell them the benefits of working with me means nothing is subcontracted so I don't need to contact others to hold things, nor do I have other dj's that will use my inventory of items and they can add items at a later date (couples LOVE this, as most other companies pressure to add things at time of booking with no option to change their minds).

Keep in mind within each question there are follow up questions or clarifications needed specific to their needs or expectations. We also do sidetrack here and there, but I feel those random side conversations create a better connection and relationship between me and my couples. Couples love the time spent and the dedication in hearing them out. The one consistent comment I receive is that my conversation was the most informative and exciting conversation they had with any vendor.
What you are trying to sell - me, . . is fully contained in just the last sentence.

Sales is learning to put that sentence first - not last. Your meetings run long because you take too long to get to the point.
That's not to say you shouldn't make people comfortable and be cordial but it doesn't take an entire hour or 13 paragraphs to do that.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,910
1,806
64
What you are trying to sell - me, . . is fully contained in just the last sentence.

Sales is learning to put that sentence first - not last. Your meetings run long because you take too long to get to the point.
That's not to say you shouldn't make people comfortable and be cordial but it doesn't take an entire hour or 13 paragraphs to do that.
He's done a great job building his business and imagine. I say if it's working, keep doing what you're doing.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
8,028
5,285
He's done a great job building his business and imagine. I say if it's working, keep doing what you're doing.
This thread's not about him.

You began this thread by suggesting the solution to your concerns was a new website.
What is the likelihood that Taso's blueprint is a realistic plan for YOUR business?

Are you prepared to maintain a website?
Can you keep up with all the electronic communication, electronic documents, and payment methods web users will be expecting?

Based on your prior posts detailing the kind of events, customers, and associates you work with your business is better suited to interpersonal communication and basic footwork. If you know what events you want, and the people who are running them - then half your work is already done.

I walked into a hardware store the other day and when I asked if they had any _________ the response was: "did you check our website". My response was to go down the street to the store that was interested in selling their inventory.

A website for you is like trying to throw an electronic Hail-Mary pass to a customer standing 2 yards in front of you. I think if you had a website you'd end up losing local business by pushing people online when they are already right in front of you ready to buy.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,910
1,806
64
This thread's not about him.

You began this thread by suggesting the solution to your concerns was a new website.
What is the likelihood that Taso's blueprint is a realistic plan for YOUR business?

Are you prepared to maintain a website?
Can you keep up with all the electronic communication, electronic documents, and payment methods web users will be expecting?

Based on your prior posts detailing the kind of events, customers, and associates you work with your business is better suited to interpersonal communication and basic footwork. If you know what events you want, and the people who are running them - then half your work is already done.
I said what I did because he's doing a successful business and you didn't need to put him down for how he's doing business. Just because he's doing things differently from you doesn't mean he's doing things wrong. I personally like him being detail oriented with clients. That way he knows what they want and they know what to expect of him.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
8,028
5,285
I said what I did because he's doing a successful business and you didn't need to put him down for how he's doing business. Just because he's doing things differently from you doesn't mean he's doing things wrong. I personally like him being detail oriented with clients. That way he knows what they want and they know what to expect of him.
How does doing something different from what you need help YOU?

Time to put down the shiny object and get to work. :)
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,910
1,806
64
How does doing something different from what you need help YOU?

Time to put down the shiny object and get to work. :)
I was pointing out how he does things because when he goes through a long consultation with a client he has already established they either want to book him or already have. I just said I agree with how he does things. How what he does can help me is by listening to how he does things. Not saying I have to copy everything he does, just be open minded, which I will admit I have a hard time to do at times. My self centered Ness can get in the way at times.

I love the idea of using my business page and adding on to it.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
8,028
5,285
I love the idea of using my business page and adding on to it.
What kind of events do you want to do?

What is the profile of a person planning that kind of event?

How does that profiled person typically shop for their event?

Where would that effort most likely intersect with YOU?

What are the key factors that lead them to a decision?

Does any of this indicate a need for you to have a website?
 

azdeejay

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 1, 2015
2,534
3,615
41
Phoenix AZ
My wife HATES calling ANYONE. If there's an issue with an order... she'd rather deal with it via email, even if it takes days to resolve via the back and forth, where a phone call would resolve everything in less than an hour.
As an old ass millennial, this is me 100%, I hate, HATE talking on the now unless I have to and will always prefer email/text, I don't even answer the DJ phone line.........I probably should 🤨
 
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