I decided I want to start using the lights we have at events we're doing.

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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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I was telling my partner I wanted to start using a light setup at events we're doing in the future. We have some decent lights that we can use at events and haven't been using as of late. I want to just use them. My partner said clients won't pay for us using the lights. I told him I'm not looking to get paid for offering the lights. I want to offer the lights so people can see what we can offer. Looking to get people wanting to book us to do events. Just looking to get some nice pictures and videos with the light setup that will help us get more bookings. I know ultimately the people got to enjoy our performance at an event for someone else wanting to get us to do an event for them. We both are very talented DJs. We know the right music to play at an event and we both know how to read a crowd.

Myself I'm not ready to hang up the headphones just yet. I will be using the lights at an upcoming event that I will be the DJ in January. My aim is that after this event that they don't look any further and want me to come do another event for them when they do another one. Also I want to say I gave out at least one business card at that event. With that event I want to give them something they are not used to seeing.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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I want to just use them. My partner said clients won't pay for us using the lights. I told him I'm not looking to get paid for offering the lights. I want to offer the lights so people can see what we can offer.
So, you're going to do something your customers don't want just to suit your own personal agenda? Never mind not getting paid for the lights - it sounds like you're on the fast track to not getting paid at all.

'Free' will not make anyone appreciative of an unwanted annoyance.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

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So, you're going to do something your customers don't want just to suit your own personal agenda? Never mind not getting paid for the lights - it sounds like you're on the fast track to not getting paid at all.

'Free' will not make anyone appreciative of an unwanted annoyance.
No sir. I just don't won't offer them. I will ask first if they want us to provide the lights. Some will say yes and some will say no. I don't see a lot of clients saying no. Again my aim is to getting more bookings and I figure the lights can't hurt. What will hurt is if we suck at our performance at an event. I've seen some use great equipment but sucked at DJing.
 

Proformance

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Nov 6, 2006
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Again my aim is to getting more bookings and I figure the lights can't hurt. What will hurt is if we suck at our performance at an event.
The key to more bookings is customer trust. You lose that trust when you bring to an event anything that distracts from their intended experience. For mobile DJs trust actually matters MORE than how well we perform. There are plenty of great performers who remain under-employed because they consistently undermine customer trust.

Your clientele appears to be a largely retirement age crowd and their event goals do not appear centered on the DJ or lighting. These "speaker jams" for example, suggest a mission that departs from your personal goal to rock the house and party like it's 1999. It's 2021, and time to adjust your notions about what these groups represent and are tying to achieve with their events, even when they include dancing.

In particular, support groups related to substance abuse and psychedelic DJ rave lights are a stark contradiction. There are other ways to direct your DJ presentation that would add more value for those that hire you.
 

Scott Hanna

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Oct 25, 2006
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The key to more bookings is customer trust. You lose that trust when you bring to an event anything that distracts from their intended experience. For mobile DJs trust actually matters MORE than how well we perform. There are plenty of great performers who remain under-employed because they consistently undermine customer trust.

Your clientele appears to be a largely retirement age crowd and their event goals do not appear centered on the DJ or lighting. These "speaker jams" for example, suggest a mission that departs from your personal goal to rock the house and party like it's 1999. It's 2021, and time to adjust your notions about what these groups represent and are tying to achieve with their events, even when they include dancing.

In particular, support groups related to substance abuse and psychedelic DJ rave lights are a stark contradiction. There are other ways to direct your DJ presentation that would add more value for those that hire you.
Bob is spot on here. It’s called reading the crowd and it starts with reading your customer way before the event and understanding what’s important to them and their event.
When I see friction between a vendor and a customer, it’s often because the vendor didn’t hear the listen to the customer enough. I’m not there aren’t tough customers. But it’s just not something we ever seem to have to deal with. I like to think it’s because we do a good Job before the event of having the customer trust us.
 

sonic-vision

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I interested in the fixtures you will be offering free of charge ? Bob & Scott have mentioned some very valid points.
Maybe you might consider some advice? I'm considering offering dancing on the clouds free at baby showers.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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The key to more bookings is customer trust. You lose that trust when you bring to an event anything that distracts from their intended experience. For mobile DJs trust actually matters MORE than how well we perform. There are plenty of great performers who remain under-employed because they consistently undermine customer trust.

Your clientele appears to be a largely retirement age crowd and their event goals do not appear centered on the DJ or lighting. These "speaker jams" for example, suggest a mission that departs from your personal goal to rock the house and party like it's 1999. It's 2021, and time to adjust your notions about what these groups represent and are tying to achieve with their events, even when they include dancing.

In particular, support groups related to substance abuse and psychedelic DJ rave lights are a stark contradiction. There are other ways to direct your DJ presentation that would add more value for those that hire you.
Idisagree that a DJs performance is not as important as a client trusting a DJ to do their event. The client can book a DJ they feel they can trust to do their event for them but if the DJs performance at the event is sub par or they suck, the client will not remember how they trusted that DJ to do their event. All they will remember is how poor a job the DJ did and they should have never booked that DJ. The aim should be to do a super great job at any event you do so either the client will book you again, someone else there at the event will want you to do an event for them or someone they know and the word spreads about how really good a DJ you are.

Now the reason they are looking for me to do that event on January 15th 2022 is because someone there was at another event I did and highly recommended me to do this event. I was told they are dying to have me do this event. If I sucked at an event they were at, they wouldn't have called me to do this event.
 

Proformance

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Nov 6, 2006
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... someone there was at another event I did and highly recommended me to do this event.
It's important to know WHY given referrals are happening. You are making an assumption that the recommendation is based on an outstanding DJ performance when the reality of their decision may be rooted in other factors.

I know there is an abundance of talent in my area. Thus, the referrals I get cannot be due to me being the most talented DJ. I also don't run my business as a talent agency or "show" experience. It's not even due to me being more affordable because, in many cases I'm not.

I get referrals because I'm consistently reliable, knowledgeable, and able to guide people through the whole event process - especially when the events are larger and more technically complicated. I present well, and can often identify important considerations about an event that they have overlooked. I know this because I listen carefully to the feedback people give even unwittingly, and most of my customers are continuous repeat clients, or relatives and coworkers thereof, reaching back 20 years or more. Even other DJs and vendors refer me for the same reasons. Understanding WHY I get referrals helps me to identify who my ideal client is, and where to find them.

You need to make the same assessments about WHY someone is referring you so that you can make good decisions on everything from what equipment to bring, the price to charge, and the scale of performance to deliver. If you approach every event as though you were decorating a Christmas tree or that more is better, you will be ignoring some very subtle but important information.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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It's important to know WHY given referrals are happening. You are making an assumption that the recommendation is based on an outstanding DJ performance when the reality of their decision may be rooted in other factors.

I know there is an abundance of talent in my area. Thus, the referrals I get cannot be due to me being the most talented DJ. I also don't run my business as a talent agency or "show" experience. It's not even due to me being more affordable because, in many cases I'm not.

I get referrals because I'm consistently reliable, knowledgeable, and able to guide people through the whole event process - especially when the events are larger and more technically complicated. I present well, and can often identify important considerations about an event that they have overlooked. I know this because I listen carefully to the feedback people give even unwittingly, and most of my customers are continuous repeat clients, or relatives and coworkers thereof, reaching back 20 years or more. Even other DJs and vendors refer me for the same reasons. Understanding WHY I get referrals helps me to identify who my ideal client is, and where to find them.

You need to make the same assessments about WHY someone is referring you so that you can make good decisions on everything from what equipment to bring, the price to charge, and the scale of performance to deliver. If you approach every event as though you were decorating a Christmas tree or that more is better, you will be ignoring some very subtle but important information.
You just said it yourself. People are either referring you or repeat clients because of the job you did. Same here pal. Again I did not say I was automatically just going to bring the lights to every event we do. Have to find out first if it's OK with the client first. I know the event in January they won't have an issue with me using lights at the event and please stop thinking all I do is play music for seniors or older people and that's it. Not true.

Again no matter how much you convince someone to trust you, you still have to deliver a really good performance so they will say you did a good job for them, refer you to others or ask you to do another event for them. Me and my friend talk about how a client will not book us for an event that they have booked us to do multiple times. Usually it's because they want to save money. Usually they regret their decision and will see if you can do the event for them again. If either me or my friend decide to do another event for them it's not for the same price. There is a price increase and most have no problem with the price increase because they realized their big mistake.
 

ittigger

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... how a client will not book us for an event that they have booked us to do multiple times. Usually it's because they want to save money. Usually they regret their decision and will see if you can do the event for them again. If either me or my friend decide to do another event for them it's not for the same price. There is a price increase and most have no problem with the price increase because they realized their big mistake.
This is pathetic on all levels. There is something seriously wrong with raising a price to a customer simply because they came back. I hope businesses learn to do this to you - more than they already take advantage of you.
 

Proformance

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Nov 6, 2006
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Again no matter how much you convince someone to trust you, ...
I don't 'convince' anyone to trust me. It's not even on my to do list when trying to make a booking,
Trust is earned. Sometimes it's earned right up front with apparent knowledge and expertise. In other cases it's earned by reputation, or repeated experiences.

If we are waiting for a specific outcome (i.e. "good job") then we don't understand the difference between satisfaction and trust.
A satisfied customer walks away happy, but they do in fact walk away (one and done.) Trust is a customer that holds us first in their mind. Even if they themselves do not return with another event they continue to direct others to our business. Their name is constantly coming up in our sales conversations.

...you still have to deliver a really good performance so they will say you did a good job for them, refer you to others or ask you to do another event for them.
That's simply not true. We can have meaningful and even serious issues at an event and STILL remain their trusted vendor if we are in fact demonstrating professional competence and remain reliable in how we address the issues. Most DJs are already working on thin ice - equipped with minimal resources and a limited knowledge base. Some will have backup gear but rarely an alternate plan.


Me and my friend talk about how a client will not book us for an event that they have booked us to do multiple times. Usually it's because they want to save money. Usually they regret their decision and will see if you can do the event for them again. If either me or my friend decide to do another event for them it's not for the same price. There is a price increase and most have no problem with the price increase because they realized their big mistake.
It sounds like they find you unreliable because of your arbitrary pricing. If it''s truly the same event and you keep changing prices - there's no trust.

When I quote a different price it's rooted in discernible changes to the event or conditions. While each of my clients may be paying different rates, any one client pays the same price each time they repeat an order for the same service.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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I don't 'convince' anyone to trust me. It's not even on my to do list when trying to make a booking,
Trust is earned. Sometimes it's earned right up front with apparent knowledge and expertise. In other cases it's earned by reputation, or repeated experiences.

If we are waiting for a specific outcome (i.e. "good job") then we don't understand the difference between satisfaction and trust.
A satisfied customer walks away happy, but they do in fact walk away (one and done.) Trust is a customer that holds us first in their mind. Even if they themselves do not return with another event they continue to direct others to our business. Their name is constantly coming up in our sales conversations.



That's simply not true. We can have meaningful and even serious issues at an event and STILL remain their trusted vendor if we are in fact demonstrating professional competence and remain reliable in how we address the issues. Most DJs are already working on thin ice - equipped with minimal resources and a limited knowledge base. Some will have backup gear but rarely an alternate plan.




It sounds like they find you unreliable because of your arbitrary pricing. If it''s truly the same event and you keep changing prices - there's no trust.

When I quote a different price it's rooted in discernible changes to the event or conditions. While each of my clients may be paying different rates, any one client pays the same price each time they repeat an order for the same service.
What that last part is about is this. Some will decide to look for someone to do the event for a cheaper price after they have used you several times. The DJ they get to do the event the next time doesn't do as good a job as you did leaving the client pissed of and mad at themselves for not having you to do the event. They realize their mistake and they look to see if you can do the next event for them. If I agree to do it for them, WHY SHOULD I DO IT FOR THE SAME PRICE AS BEFORE!? They made the mistake not me. It's a matter of them disrespecting me and I need to be respected for the work I do. What's with this thing about changing prices? Do you keep doing an event for the same price or do you at times increase your price? I'm not talking a dramatic price increase, just one that if they feel I'm worth it they should have no problem with paying the increase. We've had it happen and that is a client thinks they will get the same quality from another DJ willing to do it for a cheaper price. Most times that is not the case and the client realizes why they pay us what they do.

Now what's with this backup thing and having more then just backup gear? You should be fine with the backup gear you bring to an event. It's called having reliable backup gear. If you don't then you have the wrong backup gear. First you should have reliable gear that you normally don't have to use backup gear.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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What that last part is about is this. Some will decide to look for someone to do the event for a cheaper price after they have used you several times.
This is a fantasy DJs use to excuse their lack of customer retention.

They realize their mistake and they look to see if you can do the next event for them. If I agree to do it for them, WHY SHOULD I DO IT FOR THE SAME PRICE AS BEFORE!?
Because it's plainly obvious to anyone that you are trying to punish the customer. They should (and usually do) walk away for good at that point.

It's a matter of them disrespecting me and I need to be respected ...
Absolute proof that you are seeking revenge not their business interest.
The problem with selling ego to people looking for DJ entertainment is a simple one: You are stocking the wrong inventory.
 

Jeff Romard

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Sep 4, 2006
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This is a fantasy DJs use to excuse their lack of customer retention.

The problem with selling ego to people looking for DJ entertainment is a simple one: You are stocking the wrong inventory.
Bob is right on the mark it's very rare people will change on price only if they are happy. There's also a shelf life to entertainment most will change after a few years of events if only to try something else
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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This is a fantasy DJs use to excuse their lack of customer retention.



Because it's plainly obvious to anyone that you are trying to punish the customer. They should (and usually do) walk away for good at that point.


Absolute proof that you are seeking revenge not their business interest.
The problem with selling ego to people looking for DJ entertainment is a simple one: You are stocking the wrong inventory.
I completely stand by what I said and I'm not changing my mind. I was doing an event for a certain price and decided to raise the price. It's a lot of work to get the job done and we decided that we need to get paid more. We were told they could get anybody to do it for the old price. They did get a couple of guys to do it for that price. The big problem is that they didn't get the same quality that we would have provided. That's why they came back to us and agreed to the new price without any hesitation. The year after that without us asking for more we were paid even more.
 

sonic-vision

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The chevy dealership is where I take my vehicles for service . Why would the dealer charge me more for an oil change to punish me for returning if their cost hasn't increased ?? Repeat clients get a better rate for my services as long as my cost to provide the same services hasn't increased .
Question ? How can you increase clients cost when you are providing services for free??
 

Ausumm

Gold Plated Productions
Oct 21, 2008
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Bethlehem PA
Okay time for a little honesty.
Of all the pictures I've seen of your setup,
(and you usually do not take pictures of your setup)
it's already a hot mess.
Add a light stand with a bunch of random lights screwed on it, and you're talking about wiring messy nightmare.
Something that will not impress anyone, and will not get you any referrals.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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The chevy dealership is where I take my vehicles for service . Why would the dealer charge me more for an oil change to punish me for returning if their cost hasn't increased ?? Repeat clients get a better rate for my services as long as my cost to provide the same services hasn't increased .
Question ? How can you increase clients cost when you are providing services for free??
Not free for most events we do sir. Anyhow we increased the price because there is a super lot of work involved at this event and we need to use a ton of gear for this event. Again like I said there are times that where I learned you teach people how to treat you. The event I'm the DJ in I asked what their budget was to do the event instead of giving them a price. I was told the amount and was asked if I could do it for less? I stood my ground and said no. I was told how bad they wanted me. So if they want me that bad then they will pay the amount they have allotted for the DJ.