How much should you pay to rent each item for a wedding?

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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,875
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The skill is using technology to create incredible moments in real time that are cherished forever through amazing photos and videos.
A skill currently exercised by every teenager with a cellphone. :)

There is also a skill in the timing of the sparks, how often, how long… and for the clouds you could dump 10ths of ice all at once like most… or buy 40lbs and do 4 10lb drops throughout the first dance to have multiple bursts of nice thick clouds that make the effect look full and impressive for the whole song, and not just good for 15 seconds and then looks barely there for the rest of the song like most DJs do.
We can be the best ice-dump-timer of all DJs but, we're still a DJ dumping ice. Soon we need a new gimmick, and then another, and another, until suddenly they don't work anymore. We would simply AGE out of the job ... rather than GROW out of the job.

These are not really skills at all - just a benefit of repeated actions and experience. The whole carousel of novelty leaves us treading water and feeling very BUSY but not actually moving forward or creating anything for ourselves. This is perfectly fine if it's always going to be just a sideline gig or hobby but, potentially disappointing if what someone really wants is a career.

Never let a job - get in the way of a career.

I've always been happier and better rewarded when I aim higher to produce a personal inventory as opposed to a physical inventory of products to peddle. There is always going to be a next thing.... what do you envision as the next you?
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
4,186
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www.djtaso.com
A skill currently exercised by every teenager with a cellphone. :)



We can be the best ice-dump-timer of all DJs but, we're still a DJ dumping ice. Soon we need a new gimmick, and then another, and another, until suddenly they don't work anymore. We would simply AGE out of the job ... rather than GROW out of the job.

These are not really skills at all - just a benefit of repeated actions and experience. The whole carousel of novelty leaves us treading water and feeling very BUSY but not actually moving forward or creating anything for ourselves. This is perfectly fine if it's always going to be just a sideline gig or hobby but, potentially disappointing if what someone really wants is a career.

Never let a job - get in the way of a career.

I've always been happier and better rewarded when I aim higher to produce a personal inventory as opposed to a physical inventory of products to peddle. There is always going to be a next thing.... what do you envision as the next you?
And this is where I think market/region plays a role. A high end DJ in this region cannot survive without having the extras, or as you say "novelty items". Whereas in your area, items like sparklers are prohibited and dancing on the clouds is frowned upon by most venues... here it's almost a standard in the high end weddings. In your area it isn't something that is part of the conversation as much. You can be an awesome dj, but without these in your inventory here... it's hard to win over those top paying couples. So on top of your dj skills, you have to have a portfolio of awesome photos and video of these effects in action to show couples you can in fact create the look they're seeking (usually captured by a professional). Pixel Tube lighting is gaining popularity here... and after doing just one wedding with it and posting a couple of photos, I already had 2 couples say they love the setup and want it for their event. DJ's are running out looking for these, as they know couples will soon want that "look"... downside is they're on backorder for months. Same thing with podium booths... high end couples here are educated on the different "looks" a dj can have, and don't want the basic spandex facade, and most certainly don't want a table. Different markets have different couples. As Joe Bunn says often... if you wanna know the trends coming to your market, just look at NJ and Staten Island.

Another thing I learned is couples don't like to have to rent out on their own, or when dj's subcontract. They can tell when they're being given a marked up cost, when you're $300+ more for the same item with no real justification.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,875
5,189
And this is where I think market/region plays a role. A high end DJ in this region cannot survive without having the extras, or as you say "novelty items". Whereas in your area, items like sparklers are prohibited and dancing on the clouds is frowned upon by most venues... here it's almost a standard in the high end weddings. In your area it isn't something that is part of the conversation as much. You can be an awesome dj, but without these in your inventory here... it's hard to win over those top paying couples. So on top of your dj skills, you have to have a portfolio of awesome photos and video of these effects in action to show couples you can in fact create the look they're seeking (usually captured by a professional). Pixel Tube lighting is gaining popularity here... and after doing just one wedding with it and posting a couple of photos, I already had 2 couples say they love the setup and want it for their event. DJ's are running out looking for these, as they know couples will soon want that "look"... downside is they're on backorder for months. Same thing with podium booths... high end couples here are educated on the different "looks" a dj can have, and don't want the basic spandex facade, and most certainly don't want a table. Different markets have different couples. As Joe Bunn says often... if you wanna know the trends coming to your market, just look at NJ and Staten Island.

Again, you're fixated on merchandising rather than the talent, which is a common mistake among DJs. If as you suggest, this merchandise is a requirement to close our bookings - then we are not really in the DJ business. The job we are selling and subsequently perform is something different than the label we applied.

You know this intuitively because you're often one of the first respondents to threads in which someone poses adding a new "effect" as a way to increase their price or reach a better clientele. We already know it doesn't work that way. Discriminating clientele hire based on references and proven results - not curb appeal. I can literally pull part of the show, and not have to adjust the bill because the fee was not based on any particular piece of merchandise being deployed. I can provide a cloud to dance on - but your invoice is for the event as a whole not a schedule of merchandise or effects.

I don't think you really know enough about my area, it's trends, or what is and isn't allowed by venues to draw any meaningful conclusions. Your notion of "high end" (as you call it) appears to have a short horizon.

"Trendy" means you are doing what has already been done and is being repeated en mass. As a DJ you are imitating not creating, and like fashion the photos are a way to clothe yourself in the latest style trends - designed, created, and showcased by someone well ahead of you.

All of this trickles down from event planners, decorators, set designers, lighting and production houses. A DJ can most certainly be "high end" and never lay a finger on ANY of this stuff. (It's only the online retail Chinese knock-offs that are on back order.) The production community in "my area" (and yours) knows where to find it and how to get these things, often on short notice.

Another thing I learned is couples don't like to have to rent out on their own, or when dj's subcontract. They can tell when they're being given a marked up cost, when you're $300+ more for the same item with no real justification.
Truly high end events have dozens of sub-contracts. I'm sub-contracted at least 1/3 of the time and usually for things well above and beyond the DJ role. I often subcontract others as well. I agree that people want to hire someone else to do all of these things but, nobody is opposed to sub contracts. If they appear that way - their issue is credibility regarding the strength and reliability of our professional connections - not the act of sub-contracting in and of itself.
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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www.djtaso.com
Again, you're fixated on merchandising rather than the talent, which is a common mistake among DJs. If as you suggest, this merchandise is a requirement to close our bookings - then we are not really in the DJ business. The job we are selling and subsequently perform is something different than the label we applied.

You know this intuitively because you're often one of the first respondents to threads in which someone poses adding a new "effect" as a way to increase their price or reach a better clientele. We already know it doesn't work that way. Discriminating clientele hire based on references and proven results - not curb appeal. I can literally pull part of the show, and not have to adjust the bill because the fee was not based on any particular piece of merchandise being deployed. I can provide a cloud to dance on - but your invoice is for the event as a whole not a schedule of merchandise or effects.

I don't think you really know enough about my area, it's trends, or what is and isn't allowed by venues to draw any meaningful conclusions. Your notion of "high end" (as you call it) appears to have a short horizon.

"Trendy" means you are doing what has already been done and is being repeated en mass. As a DJ you are imitating not creating, and like fashion the photos are a way to clothe yourself in the latest style trends - designed, created, and showcased by someone well ahead of you.

All of this trickles down from event planners, decorators, set designers, lighting and production houses. A DJ can most certainly be "high end" and never lay a finger on ANY of this stuff. (It's only the online retail Chinese knock-offs that are on back order.) The production community in "my area" (and yours) knows where to find it and how to get these things, often on short notice.



Truly high end events have dozens of sub-contracts. I'm sub-contracted at least 1/3 of the time and usually for things well above and beyond the DJ role. I often subcontract others as well. I agree that people want to hire someone else to do all of these things but, nobody is opposed to sub contracts. If they appear that way - their issue is credibility regarding the strength and reliability of our professional connections - not the act of sub-contracting in and of itself.
We have to preface this with acknowledging that I'm strictly talking about the wedding industry. Corporate is a whole different animal.

Now I'm not fixated on merchandising... the talent is and should be the primary draw to a couple... but if a couple can't get the complete package, they will find other top quality entertainers who will have a full selection of services. It's not about offering "novelty items"... it's about creating the full experience that they seek. In NJ and the surrounding market outside of NYC perhaps, it's about going big and creating signature moments with the coolest effects and technology or live musicians. Now in my area, top tier companies for example are SCE, Posh DJ's and Elite Sound... and on their sites all of them have sections dedicated solely to the enhancements they offer in house. Couples want to know what DJ's offer before reaching out... they don't want to waste their time if a dj doesn't have sparklers. Couples now know subcontracting means overpaying.

How you price is up to you... but again, you have to know your market. Here it's the DJ plus the enhancements. While you get a total event price... essentially it's either packages or a la carte... but a couple understands what the break down is in terms of the cost for whatever items they add. I did the wedding booking process for myself... I contacted 2 of my go to companies... They had a catalog with about 20 line items with the individual prices that I could add to my event (although my crew provided just about everything). If you decide to price the whole event without a breakdown or without the couple understanding the cost of each item, it'll be met with skepticism. Those days are long gone here where pricing isn't presented ahead of your consultation, or pricing isn't itemized. That left almost a decade ago... and the old school companies that responded to inquiries asking for pricing by saying "we want to know more about your event first" or "only offered in person or after a consultation", are no longer in business or have diminished to doing birthday parties. Couples want pricing up front and in package or a la carte form with pricing ahead of time.

I'm also not talking about your area though (new england area I beleive), where popular items we offer aren't even allowed like sparklers, clouds, snow effects, co2 blasts. I speak to Dj's there, and To increase your total event price, you have to go way beyond the scope of what a DJ here would normally offer. You may have to focus more on decor, or lounge furniture, or other elements that here would be provided by others. In the area I and mix serve... DJ's handle music and production, florists and event designers handle decor and other presentation items, photographers handle their field etc. I find it fascinating in NJ that we don't have distinguished wedding planners like in other states... but it's simply because here things are handled differently. "Event planners" here are really just super high end florists and decorators. The closest you get to one is hiring an all day coordinator who really just handles day of aspects or booking unique services like food trucks. I've yet to work with an actual wedding planner in NJ who handles all the vendors, handles all the contracts, etc, and many of my weddings are well over six figures.

DJ's that tried to dip their hands into too many things outside of their realm of what's expected, unless it was the Mitzvah market, ultimately failed in the wedding market because they didn't seem to specialize in any one thing (long gone are the days of dj's offering limos, photo/video, etc). Couples seek dj's that play awesome music and create amazing moments through lighting and effects, end of story. Even the live musicians are getting smart and are no longer being subcontracted through dj's but are marketing themselves and charging and keeping 100% of what the dj's charged. The top live saxaphonist and drummer no longer contract through dj's.

The a/v production community also doesn't really have a place here in the wedding industry (corporate market is different). Perhaps with bands they will, as most don't offer any level of enhancements, and therefore an outside company needs to come in, but not when it comes to DJ productions. All the top tier dj's here will supply all their own enhancements... it's the dj's they outsource if needed... almost as if the DJ is secondary to some clients. I aimed to change that by marketing myself as the individual first, but also being able to provide the entire experience. I honestly don't know of any dj company here that really markets the individual DJ's talent first (not just dj's generically), with exception of SCE.

Also many of the top tier venues here that can actually handle the large concert level productions do have massive lighting and a/v productions already installed with 40+ moving heads or effects, co2 cannons, projectors all around the room, etc... which can be added to a couples package and a tech is hired from the dj company they partner with... so again, no a/v production companies involved in that.

All the biggest celebrity weddings in NJ who spent hundreds of thousands on their reception alone, still utilized the same elements that I mentioned above with DJ's offering everything in house. Only difference is instead of 2 or 4 sparklers or moving heads, they expand on that to go big... or they use the venues in house lighting and effect production if available. The decor company's are the ones where the most money is spent on florals, upgraded chairs, lounge furniture, table displays, etc.

Now if you're talking about performers or special acts... again those are things that can be hired directly from the event planner (again, glorified florist/decorator) or talent agencies directly or for more extreme acts like acrobats from the ceiling or caged lions, those may need to go through the venues sources for the people they approve and allow to provide those services (I've had fire acts, stunt performers from vegas and caged lions for a hollywood theme at my past events). if you're talking about girls in champagne dresses or costumes for themed events, again, those are through event planners or venue provided sources that they personally allow. For example some venues only allow certain florists for certain style designs.

There's only one company I know that provides the selling style that you are referencing where a total price is simply given, and they offer just about anything under the sun, with half the items being subcontracted. They are extremely successful... but primarily in NYC for corporate functions/weddings/and mitzvahs... while they had a thriving Mitzvah market in NJ up until 2016 or so, their wedding market never took off because their approach never sat well with couples who were being charged obnoxious amounts with no breakdown as to how that price was conceived and/or being nickel and dimed for everything (who has a "Delivery fee")... eventually other Mitzvah only companies overtook the market with branding targeting mitzvahs specifically compared to their approach which was essentially being branded as a big spenders entertainment/production company. That pricing and selling strategy just doesn't work here for the wedding market.

Ultimately, I'm just curious of what this experience is that you provide to your 25-35yr old wedding couples and how you handle their initial inquiries of "we're interested in learning more about your pricing?"
 

ProDJ Jose

Mobile DJ Consultant
Apr 19, 2016
72
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Tampa Bay Area
Once again, there's nothing new here. During the Golden Era of Mobile DJing, the 90s, as @Proformance probably knows, there were high-end entertainment service providers in long island that were selling talent & gear at high-end prices without smart phones, the internet, or social media.

These companies such as, https://harttohart.com (https://www.richiehartevents.com) focused on Bar/Bat Mitvahs and offered everything and relied on WOM for new business. I wish Richard Hart was a member of this forum so that he could chime in. The rumor was that he arrived to work in a Limo.

Whether today's Mobile DJ Service provider sells talent or is gear focused is really not that important. The lesson here is that today a single op @djtaso can utilize the benefits of social media, as well as WOM, to spread the word and create a successful operation. It's impressive what he offers and is doing for his clientele and he should be commended.

The fact is that today's Mobile DJs are primarily focus on selling their gear. Even Superstar DJs rely on their "EDM noise" and all the effects of a "concert" to sell what they do.

What I do for my clients is so unique that at almost every event that I perform, a venue rep will tell me that they have never seen a DJ that mix music videos. I can put on a show with my voice, interactive MC skills, music mixing skills, and now in the "Youtube Era" I can put on a music video mix show.

Creating a "mini-concert" experience might seem like a novelty, but it's hard work that is personally rewarding. As @djtaso so eloquently pointed out, it's all about giving the customers and their guests the very best experience, then at least for him, capturing and documenting each moments and sharing it with the "social media" world.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,875
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If you decide to price the whole event without a breakdown or without the couple understanding the cost of each item, it'll be met with skepticism. Those days are long gone here where pricing isn't presented ahead of your consultation, or pricing isn't itemized. That left almost a decade ago... and the old school companies that responded to inquiries asking for pricing by saying "we want to know more about your event first" or "only offered in person or after a consultation", are no longer in business or have diminished to doing birthday parties. Couples want pricing up front and in package or a la carte form with pricing ahead of time.
This sounds more like a post by DJ Ricky.

The inquiries we receive are driven by the solicitation style we employ. Individual assumptions about what couples want is a self reflection not a market trend.

I'm also not talking about your area though (new england area I beleive), where popular items we offer aren't even allowed like sparklers, clouds, snow effects, co2 blasts.
When did this happen? LOL. I can assure you all these things are alive and well in New England. I just said that I'm personally not interested in promoting them to upscale adult events. I have no desire to sell bat mitzvahs and sweet 16's to adult brides. You can have that customer - been there and done with it.

I find it fascinating in NJ that we don't have distinguished wedding planners l
None that you're aware of...

Even the live musicians are getting smart and are no longer being subcontracted through dj's but are marketing themselves and charging and keeping 100% of what the dj's charged.
Huh. I'd imagined that after all these centuries of live music they'd have found someone to represent them. :)
I'm pretty sure there's no musicians waiting at home for a DJ to call.

I honestly don't know of any dj company here that really markets the individual DJ's talent first....
You can find that assessment in the first line of my previous post. Not sure what all the mental gymnastics are about.

PS: Just rigged and deployed a snow machine last Sunday. The client supplied their own.
 
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djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
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When did this happen? LOL. I can assure you all these things are alive and well in New England. I just said that I'm personally not interested in promoting them to upscale adult events. I have no desire to sell bat mitzvahs and sweet 16's to adult brides. You can have that customer - been there and done with it.
In New England the fire marshalls do not allow the use of Sparklers and many prominent venues do not allow smoke of any sort (clouds or co2 therefore not being allowed). I've now had 3 weddings in Connecticut where they rejected these effects. One was still in the venue shopping phase and simply crossed the bridge and picked an NY venue with no issues.

None that you're aware of...
Again, the wedding planners of the style that you speak of primarily operate in NYC or Philly (one just called me because they needed a greek dj... but . Wedding planners in NJ are moreso glorified event designers with their focus being on floral, decor elements, and other various elements. We do have some great Event Planners in the Mitzvah market that essentially handle everyhing for their clients and bring in all the vendors... but weddings is different. I invite you to share with whom you know in NJ that is a high end event planner of the magnitude you speak of.

I'm pretty sure there's no musicians waiting at home for a DJ to call.
Again... Dj's are what made the live musician/dj combo a thing, and just about all dj companies would be the source to contract these options. In fact I've lost a number of weddings because other dj's would contract live musicians and I wouldn't (I don't subcontract period). However, in the last 2 years, many of the best ones now book directly. There are still some musicians that do not do any client care or contracts and essentially just want to show up... they're the ones still partnering with dj's to book their services.

The inquiries we receive are driven by the solicitation style we employ. Individual assumptions about what couples want is a self reflection not a market trend.
It'd be nice if you elaborated on that with examples to really showcase what allows you to stand apart in your market and achieve the results you speak of.

By the way, another example of something djs tried to do, but never played out as them being the go to source for it: Drapery. About 5 years ago many top djs tried to offer drapery for rooms or for behind sweetheart tables. It was the florists and event decorators that ultimately became the go to sources for that. Likewise with photographers and photo booths. Many photographers tried to offer it, but djs are the go to source for that. Coincidentally, if clients want custom backdrops or something unique it is the florist/event designer that creates it, even though the DJ provides the machine.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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Let me say I'm proud of Taso and what he has to offer. He can offer a lot of things that others don't offer. I won't say can't because that's subjective to each DJ. Some simply can't afford to buy the stuff he has to offer. They probably can but ti takes planning to get those things. He deserves to get paid what he does. Also it's not that he just has those things to offer, it's knowing how to present them so future clients will be at least interested in some of the things he has to offer. Which in turn helps him with getting paid more then if he just showed up with some gear and just played music. He can provide the WOW FACTOR! People looking at what he has to offer have to say to themselves WOW. Also he doesn't deal with what we call tire kickers. The majority of the clients that book him are not on a tight budget for their wedding. Another factor too is he decided to do exclusively weddings and only does other events that he has already signed a contract to do before becoming an exclusive wedding DJ. So he's not just filling dates with just any kind of event to make some money..
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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I've now had 3 weddings in Connecticut where they rejected these effects.
Rejection by 3 venues in CT does not constitute "New England" nor does is sort out the issue of venues simply rejecting an inconvenience they don't want on the premises, or the local towns that can't or won't provide required resources. The case for rejection is rarely as simple as the stated reply.

Again, the wedding planners of the style that you speak of primarily operate in NYC...
Let's not pretend that in a country of 300 million people there's only a handful of event planners confined to New York and Philadelphia.

Again... Dj's are what made the live musician/dj combo a thing...,
No, you can thank Grandmaster Flash and Run DMC for that, likely before you were born. Again, this is imitating not creating. There are lots of Mobile DJs who like to take credit or bill things as a "new trend" when in reality these are simply things lifted from mainstream pop entertainment and television. These things are often more cyclical than new - the photo-booth being a prime example.

There's only so much that can be done with these family occasions, and when people attend many of them each year the need to be different rises in prominence - especially when the events occur in the same venues over and over again. However, merchandise will only get you so far.

.. to really showcase ...
This is one of the key indicators of merchandising - that someone can be stymied by the absence of a photograph. If you can't connect without a catalog it's because your business is rooted in merchandising.

There's nothing wrong with merchandising, but there might b'e little or no professional growth when doing it as a mobile disc-jockey. We can be personally end up every bit as disposable as any other trend.

When people contact me they are not asking about something they saw in a photo. It always begins the same way: "You come highly recommended to me by _______ as the best person for....." . and then they proceed to tell me what it is they want or need.

By the way, another example of something djs tried to do, but never played out as them being the go to source for it: Drapery.
This is another example of merchandising. The DJ is simply adding one more product (albeit someone else's) to his/her catalog.
Again you are simply adding evidence to my case.

Merchandising DJs and drapery is a failure because drapery in this context is not a product - it's a raw material used in design. DJs in this example are not designers they are simply hawking a list of goods - i.e. a panel stuck behind some table.

I use drape and fabric quite often. But, I sell a design and then order the fabric or select the appropriate drape I need to make it a reality. Pipe and drape is one example: It's not in this instance a product to be showcased - it's just a problem solver that can be applied effectively when a given situation would benefit.

This room is clearly not a wedding venue but, resides in a location that held special meaning for a couple:
gym_before.jpg

This is the same room the morning after I installed some fabric and drape:
072013131528.jpg

I don't try to sell drape. I solve problems. There's no reason to have drape behind a sweetheart table unless the bride and groom are seated in front of a utility closet. That is the folly of merchandising - it's just a gimmick. Perhaps I could rent spark boxes for $400 but I think people would soon forget about that as soon as they see them again with the next DJ. I got $8K to drape that room (on a weekday) and came back again on Saturday to DJ the wedding.

On Sunday when I went back to take the drape down - word had already spread and a steady stream of local residents kept showing up to see what had been done. This is why online photos aren't important to what I do. I'm not selling merchandise - I'm selling the know-how. The phrase I hear most often is "Oh, you're the guy who..." . as opposed to: "how much for that fog in the window..." . The former is personal and completely owned by me. The other is available over the counter and is easily imitated. That's the danger of emphasizing merchandise over something that only you can do well.

We know this intuitively because people routinely post photos in threads here that ask: "how can I imitate this" . followed by . "and how can I do it on the cheap?"

You're making a mistake when you characterize Hart-to-Hart and the many other DJ operations that followed in their wake by referencing all of this merchandise. What these people sell is TALENT - and everything else is just props. Don't get distracted by the shiny objects because longevity resides in the intangible attributes that can't be seen in a photo.
 
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djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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Rejection by 3 venues in CT does not constitute "New England" nor does is sort out the issue of venues simply rejecting an inconvenience they don't want on the premises, or the local towns that can't or won't provide required resources. The case for rejection is rarely as simple as the stated reply.
I invite you to provide me information saying otherwise. Cold sparks according to the New England fire marshalls office (who I spoke with personally) are considered a pyrotechnic and require a permit, a fire marshall on site, pyrotechnic company license and the person setting them up and pressing "fire" needs a shooter's license.

When people contact me they are not asking about something they saw in a photo. It always begins the same way: "You come highly recommended to me by _______ as the best person for....." . and then they proceed to tell me what it is they want or need.
I come recommended for creating amazing weddings... that's pretty much the summary of the inquiries I get. Effects and lighting are tools that I use to enhance the experience. Many of my couples are big on high energy club like vibes... hence why you see moving heads and uplighting at virtually all of my events. When we say trends... we're not necessarily saying something new entirely... we're talking about new or popular in the Wedding space at that moment in time in that region. For example moving heads are pretty popular in the northeast... but in the rest of the country hardly any dj offers them... you just see uplighting. When someone is finally able to break through in the market and make moving heads popular... it'll then be a trend in that area. Another example... in LA an upcharge is for white speakers and white facades, because it fits the "look" that most brides want there and dj's saw they could capitalize on that.
I use drape and fabric quite often. But, I sell a design and then order the fabric or select the appropriate drape I need to make it a reality. Pipe and drape is one example: It's not in this instance a product to be showcased - it's just a problem solver that can be applied effectively when a given situation would benefit.
Again... you can say others sell drape and you sell a design... you say I sell merchandise, whereas I say I sell an experience. I'm simply pointing out that different markets behave different ways. You go to the florists or event designers for the drapery design here... you don't go to the dj, just like you don't go to the dj for flowers. Perhaps in your area there aren't enough resources for clients to know where to go... and you're known as the problem solver. Here we have an abundance of vendors for different things, and the boundaries as to who does what are pretty clear... at least in the Wedding space.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
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Cut and dry some DJs have more to offer then others. Now just because they have such things doesn't mean they know how to sell those things or know how much to charge for those things. Also it's about who the DJ is trying to sell those things to. A bargain basement shopper is not going to want to pay for those things. They are simply looking for a DJ who will show up with some gear, play music for their event and at a nice price. Taso as much as it's entertaining please stop trying to explain things to Bob. He rarely likes to admit he is wrong. His EGO is TOO BIG for that.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,875
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I invite you to provide me information saying otherwise.
I invite you to do your own homework.
Failure to apply for the permit, pay for the detail, and clearly distinguish and document the class of product to be deployed is not the fault of "New England."

There is no "New England Fire Marshal's Office." A fire marshal is an appointee from each municipal department whose role it is to inspect and enforce fire codes - that's it. It is NOT their job to research every toy a DJ wants to play with. It's your job . to do the necessary leg work, paperwork, and meetings that would get you an approval. That's also a talent BTW - called logistics.

There is an abundance of resources in this area, your area, much of the world. There's an abundance of vendors in every category. This argument you're trying to make about trends and regions, who does what, etc. and "not in this area" owes to the limit of your personal horizon. That's it, nothing complicated.

In respect to merchandising, it was you who raised the prospect of "selling drape:"
"..about 5 years ago many top djs tried to offer drapery for rooms or for behind sweetheart tables."
This notion of "offering" something - it's called "selling." Drape behind a sweetheart table - that's merchandising. It's a defined kit or package that is promoted at a fixed price in hopes that every customer will buy into it - like sparks, dry ice, photo-booths. You can find all these "packages" online at "Event Decor Direct" and other retailers.

Many DJs market themselves with the same method - promoting the "stuff" as opposed to the talent. For example, the most noticeable thing about your own photographs - you're not in them.
 
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MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,290
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I invite you to do your own homework.
Failure to apply for the permit, pay for the detail, and clearly distinguish and document the class of product to be deployed is not the fault of "New England."

There is no "New England Fire Marshal's Office." A fire marshal is an appointee from each municipal department whose role it is to inspect and enforce fire codes - that's it. It is NOT their job to research every toy a DJ wants to play with. It's your job . to do the necessary leg work, paperwork, and meetings that would get you an approval. That's also a talent BTW.

There is an abundance of resources in this area, your area, much of the world. There's an abundance of vendors in every category. This argument you're trying to make about trends and regions, who does what, etc. and "not in this area" owes to the limit of your personal horizon. That's it, nothing complicated.

For example, it was you who raised the prospect of "selling drape:"


This notion of "offering" something - it's called "selling." Drape behind a sweetheart table - that's merchandising. It's a defined kit or package that is promoted at a fixed price in hopes that every customer will buy into it - like sparks, dry ice, photo-booths. You can find all these "packages" online at "Event Decor Direct" and other retailers.

Many DJs market themselves with the same method - promoting the "stuff" as opposed to the talent. For example, the most noticeable thing about your own photographs - you're not in them.
WHEN ARE YOU GOING TO SHOW SOMETHING YOU HAVE DONE AND STOP TALKING ABOUT OTHERS AND HOW THEY ARE OR ARE NOT DOING THINGS RIGHT ACCORDING TO YOU!!!!!!!!!! UNTIL YOU SHOW US WHAT YOU HAVE DONE OR ARE DOING RIGHT NOW KEEP QUIET!!!!!!!!!!! At least he has the balls to show us stuff he's doing and not just running off at the mouth.
 

djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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I invite you to do your own homework.
Failure to apply for the permit, pay for the detail, and clearly distinguish and document the class of product to be deployed is not the fault of "New England."

There is no "New England Fire Marshal's Office." A fire marshal is an appointee from each municipal department whose role it is to inspect and enforce fire codes - that's it. It is NOT their job to research every toy a DJ wants to play with. It's your job . to do the necessary leg work, paperwork, and meetings that would get you an approval. That's also a talent BTW - called logistics.
There is in fact a New England Association of Fire Marshalls... my apologies for not being word for word accurate. Here's their site https://www.neafm.org/ As a whole they collectively decided these sparklers are considered "pyrotechnics". They do not simply need a permit. They require a fire marshall on site and they also require a licensed shooter... of which New England only recognizes around 7 or so individuals to perform this task. So yes... can you do it... but 2 sparklers will run you close to $1500 after all fees and required individuals are paid for... as opposed to the going rate of $300-$500 in other areas. Most venues don't even allow them due to the risk involved.

By the way don't just take my word for it... take it from another dj in Boston I know used them at a private event at a rented hall and a bride who works for the state fire marshall told him to not use it because if he gets caught without a pyrotechnic license amongst other things (again only about 7 or people in NE had one as of 2018 when I last checked), including permits and day of inspections by your fire marshal, there's a huge fine and potential lawsuit liability. Feel free to contact your sources at the fire marshall and let me know if you determine otherwise.

Because of these obstacles... sparklers will never really trend in NE.

This notion of "offering" something - it's called "selling." Drape behind a sweetheart table - that's merchandising. It's a defined kit or package that is promoted at a fixed price in hopes that every customer will buy into it - like sparks, dry ice, photo-booths. You can find all these "packages" online at "Event Decor Direct" and other retailers.
I wasn't talking about sweetheart table drapery... I'm talking about full room drapery, architectural drapery, etc. Exactly what you showcased in the picture. Dj's attempted to do that... florists/event designers claimed that territory (who for some, outsource to production company's).

Many DJs market themselves with the same method - promoting the "stuff" as opposed to the talent. For example, the most noticeable thing about your own photographs - you're not in them.
You can find me on my site. I also provide photos so people can understand what uplighting refers to or what dancing in the clouds may look like, etc... not to see me. You'd be surprised how many people have never seen these items in person. Likewise, the videos take that one step further. I also don't like taking photos of myself lol.

On a side note... your site hasn't been updated since 2013... so it's not like you're depicting the most accurate version of yourself. Also if you go to your sites homepage (without the /index), your website redirects to a knockoff sneaker website. I would look into that.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,290
1,637
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There is in fact a New England Association of Fire Marshalls... my apologies for not being word for word accurate. Here's their site https://www.neafm.org/ As a whole they collectively decided these sparklers are considered "pyrotechnics". They do not simply need a permit. They require a fire marshall on site and they also require a licensed shooter... of which New England only recognizes around 7 or so individuals to perform this task. So yes... can you do it... but 2 sparklers will run you close to $1500 after all fees and required individuals are paid for... as opposed to the going rate of $300-$500 in other areas. Most venues don't even allow them due to the risk involved.

By the way don't just take my word for it... take it from another dj in Boston I know used them at a private event at a rented hall and a bride who works for the state fire marshall told him to not use it because if he gets caught without a pyrotechnic license amongst other things (again only about 7 or people in NE had one as of 2018 when I last checked), including permits and day of inspections by your fire marshal, there's a huge fine and potential lawsuit liability. Feel free to contact your sources at the fire marshall and let me know if you determine otherwise.

Because of these obstacles... sparklers will never really trend in NE.


I wasn't talking about sweetheart table drapery... I'm talking about full room drapery, architectural drapery, etc. Exactly what you showcased in the picture. Dj's attempted to do that... florists/event designers claimed that territory (who for some, outsource to production company's).


You can find me on my site. I also provide photos so people can understand what uplighting refers to or what dancing in the clouds may look like, etc... not to see me. You'd be surprised how many people have never seen these items in person. Likewise, the videos take that one step further. I also don't like taking photos of myself lol.

On a side note... your site hasn't been updated since 2013... so it's not like you're depicting the most accurate version of yourself. Also if you go to your sites homepage (without the /index), your website redirects to a knockoff sneaker website. I would look into that.
Thanks for telling him off. Yet why get into a debate with him? He rarely if at all acknowledges anybody saying or doing anything right. It's all about him and his gigantic ego.
 
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djtaso

DJ Extraordinaire
Apr 4, 2017
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Thanks for telling him off. Yet why get into a debate with him? He rarely if at all acknowledges anybody saying or doing anything right. It's all about him and his gigantic ego.
To be clear I’m not trying to tell him off. He has his view of what works and I have mine. The part about the sparklers is more About making sure the facts are out there… and the part about his site was true, and was simply trying to be helpful…. unless I was looking at the wrong site.
 

ProDJ Jose

Mobile DJ Consultant
Apr 19, 2016
72
164
Tampa Bay Area
Taso what is the address for Bob's website? I would like to see what it looks like.
Why don't you just ask Bob why he's always been so reluctant to post a link to his site?

I have a link to the website and linkedin profile, but I'd rather let him post it.

Lastly, Taso, Bob has a reputation of being obnoxious and argumentative, but he's probably a really good guy inside. I don't know him personally, but I have read his forum posts for decades and he seems very knowledgeable.
 

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
12,290
1,637
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Why don't you just ask Bob why he's always been so reluctant to post a link to his site?

I have a link to the website and linkedin profile, but I'd rather let him post it.

Lastly, Taso, Bob has a reputation of being obnoxious and argumentative, but he's probably a really good guy inside. I don't know him personally, but I have read his forum posts for decades and he seems very knowledgeable.
He may be but he's very arrogant with it. He rubs me and a lot of others on here the wrong way. Also he brags about how much he gets paid doing what he does but yet in the last few years hasn't shown us any work he has done. The saying is true, you're only as good as your last job.