Have you dealt with uneven ground?

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LittleTreeGuy

DJ Extraordinaire
Jul 30, 2021
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I have a question that I'm looking for potential solutions to. I ran into a small issue at a gig recently that was outdoors. It was on concrete, but the ground was sloped a little. I was using subs with pole mounted tops. I ended up having some small wood blocks on hand so I was able to place them under my subs to somewhat level things out. I have some of my outdoor events later this year, and I'm wondering what others may have done to combat the uneven ground issue. Not only was this an issue for my subs, but for my dj booth as well, obviously.
I was considering making a small wooden platform for each sub that has some slightly extendable pvc "legs" on them. Just enough to counter for maybe 3-5". Maybe wooden blocks are better? For looks, I plan on having some small black fabric "skirts" as well so you don't see the wood at all.

Have you ever encountered this?
 
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ittigger

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Unless the blocks you're using are solidly against the ground (will not move), I would not use stack poles on subs. For uneven ground, I use the Ultimate Stands with the leveling legs (TS99BL) - and if subs are needed, I leave the subs on the ground. Leveling your booth is not as much of an issue. In all scenarios, safety is the primary consideration.
 

LittleTreeGuy

DJ Extraordinaire
Jul 30, 2021
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@ittigger I know what you mean... unless it's solid and really level, the tops can put a lot of un-needed stress on the poles and pole cups. I know they are designed for vertical use only. The wood "blocks" I used at my previous event was a 2x4 that was laid flat (wide side down) and it spanned the width of my sub. I had no concerns there. I agree with you... if it can wobble at all, it's no good. My other fear is just the ground itself. Around here (Pennsylvania) If I do an outdoor wedding that goes into the late evening (past 9pm) there is a chance for dew to start collecting on the grass. Another reason I'm thinking of something to get my subs up off the ground, even if just an inch or two.
 

ittigger

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@ittigger I know what you mean... unless it's solid and really level, the tops can put a lot of un-needed stress on the poles and pole cups. I know they are designed for vertical use only. The wood "blocks" I used at my previous event was a 2x4 that was laid flat (wide side down) and it spanned the width of my sub. I had no concerns there. I agree with you... if it can wobble at all, it's no good. My other fear is just the ground itself. Around here (Pennsylvania) If I do an outdoor wedding that goes into the late evening (past 9pm) there is a chance for dew to start collecting on the grass. Another reason I'm thinking of something to get my subs up off the ground, even if just an inch or two.
Agreed .. I'm also considering the potential 'movement' from a sub. If there's enough force, a sub can 'walk' - and this would be really bad. A good 'insulator' is a carpet / walk / standing mat. Put that on the ground first and put your sub on it. FWIW, the ETX18 can withstand direct contact with the ground several times - but I agree, keep them off the (direct contact with) ground if at all possible.
 

TwinSpinDJ

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Use a milk crate (black) to set sub on. Take level with you and small baby sludge. Pound on the corner of the crate to level it. Also, take several pieces of 2x4 or package of leveling shims to assist in leveling the dj table. Worked for me on many occasions. Do site survey so you know how the lay of the land. Insist on portable canopy to place over DJ setup.
 
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sawdust123

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When I have to set up on grass, I am always concerned with unevenness and/or a table leg sinking in. My solution was PVC end caps. I would get at least 3 different sizes that all fit inside of each other. The smallest size would fit around the table leg. If the grass was level and I was just concerned with sinking in, I would only need one cap on each leg to spread the load out. However, by stacking the caps, I can add more height. Also, since they are nested, I don't have a concern about them slipping out from each other.

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This application works great for table legs which just have a downward force component. I wouldn't trust it for speaker stands. For that, I would use multiple blocks of wood with the top block having an angled hole for the stand leg. The other blocks could be plain. Then I would drill two holes through all the blocks and insert a rod to keep the blocks aligned.
 

Ausumm

Gold Plated Productions
Oct 21, 2008
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Maybe wooden blocks are better?
With the production company, we often have to set up stages on uneven surfaces. We carry a box of wood shims from Home Depot at all times. As far as DJ equipment, I keep a few wedges in my trailer to hold doors open, and I have used them on several occasions
 

LittleTreeGuy

DJ Extraordinaire
Jul 30, 2021
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Thanks all. I think I'll end up fabbing up some thin wooden platforms. I have large subs (ETX18sp's) so I like the mild crate idea, but it's just not deep and wide enough for my comfort level. I'll post up some pictures once I get my things built. It's just on paper at this time.
 
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TwinSpinDJ

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If you can find the larger rectangular milk crates, place two side by side to put your sub on. Use shims, too. Don't forget to bring a couple of the very large black contractor plastic bags and same for your tops to pull down in case of rain. Never hurts to be prepared. I've even brought a couple of beach umbrellas to help block sunlight and/or rain from falling on the dj setup, unless you have a canopy pop-up with you. Worked for me on several occasions for outdoor events where a pop-up was not provided by venue or client, even though they promised.