djay Pro is now a Subscription model

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
3,826
36
It is all moving to subscription based models. These companies are finding that they can earn more money this way.

I am actually spending more money on subscriptions through out the year than I would if I were to just pay $1.29 per download for all of the music I need to do events. Most of the music I play I already have in my collection. I probably needed to download less than 50 songs this entire year. I currently pay $10/month for Spotify, and $12 a month for Promo Only. $120+$144 on those 2 subscriptions alone! That is $264 year. Vs. if I were just downloading each song, and paying a fee, I would have spent about $65 or so on downloads. ...Now, Spotify is worth keeping around for on the fly instant music streaming when needed, but promo Only I can probably get rid of since most of the new music coming out is garbage, and rarely requested. I think maybe 6 or 7 songs were new songs that I needed this year that I have through promo only. $144 is a lot to play for so few songs :(

So for DJ programs, I also think subscriptions will yeild more money in the long term. DJPro was like $49 or $59 to buy outright. Now, charge everyone $60 per year. They will make more money. ....Plus these companies are finding out that they have basically reached the limits with capabilities to what these programs can do. These companies won't earn more money as time marches along unless they move to subscription based platforms. That is because it is becoming harder to come out with fresh new programs that are innovative, and worth purchasing over the previous versions.
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
3,282
One of the ways I keep subscription costs down is to always use the least amount of technology required for a given purpose. I have a lot of applications I run on much older equipment for the simple reason that they work exactly as I need them too. How far out of date the software or hardware is has no bearing on getting the productive result I want. If it works well, I don't fix it. :)

Our society is fixated on the Smart Phone mentality where people expect to use ONE device for EVERYTHING they do. That's not logical nor is it very safe. I prefer to have certain devices that are dedicated to doing what they do best. My phone for example - is used to answer phone calls. :)
 
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DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
3,826
36
One of the ways I keep subscription costs down is to always use the least amount of technology required for a given purpose. I have a lot of applicaions I run on much older equipment for the simple reason that they work exactly as I need them too. How far out of date the software or hardware is has no bearing on getting the productive result I want. If it works well, I don't fix it. :)

Our society is fixated on the Smart Phone mentality where people expect to use ONE device for EVERYTHING they do. That's not logical nor is it very safe. I prefer to have certain devices that are dedicated to doing what they do best. My phone for example - is used to answer phone calls. :)
I was in line at the post office today. Post office was very busy with everyone mailing stuff out for holidays. The lady in front of me and I carried out a small conversation. I mentioned that I did most of my holiday shopping online, and waited in very few lines this year. This one at the post office was the longest one so far. She said she does not do anything online. She doesn't own a computer, and does not even own a cell phone! She is 84 years old, and she said "When you get over 80, none of the new stuff matters any more!"

...The downside for her imo though, is that she has probably spent a lot of time waiting in lines to do her Christmas shopping over the last 5 years. Perhaps she does not mind it, but being her age, I know that standing for long amounts of time, and walking in and out of large stores must take a toll on her body.

My point is that older people tend to stick with what they have known, and "if it still works, why change it" ...This point can be a good one, but it can also be a bad one without realizing it.
 

steve149

Veni, Vidi, Lusi
Staff member
Sep 26, 2011
32,436
Prospect, CT
I was in line at the post office today. Post office was very busy with everyone mailing stuff out for holidays. The lady in front of me and I carried out a small conversation. I mentioned that I did most of my holiday shopping online, and waited in very few lines this year. This one at the post office was the longest one so far. She said she does not do anything online. She doesn't own a computer, and does not even own a cell phone! She is 84 years old, and she said "When you get over 80, none of the new stuff matters any more!"

...The downside for her imo though, is that she has probably spent a lot of time waiting in lines to do her Christmas shopping over the last 5 years. Perhaps she does not mind it, but being her age, I know that standing for long amounts of time, and walking in and out of large stores must take a toll on her body.

My point is that older people tend to stick with what they have known, and "if it still works, why change it" ...This point can be a good one, but it can also be a bad one without realizing it.
The problem there is that if she has family, THEY are online and she'll miss out on a lot of what's posted for that audience.

I take a lot of sports pictures and when I take photos of my niece's sports, I used to have my mother look at her granddaughter's photos on Facebook. Now, someone needs to bring their phone to show her the pictures, as she's dropped all internet (about 2 years ago).
 
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Handinon

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 1, 2014
1,926
72
She said she does not do anything online. She doesn't own a computer, and does not even own a cell phone! She is 84 years old, and she said "When you get over 80, none of the new stuff matters any more!"
It's not just age. We, who live in the Industrial World, have a distorted view of things. I remember a Y2K statistic that was being kicked around - as of the year 2000,
one half the world's population had never even made a phone call ! I'm sure that number has lowered in the last 18 years due to cell phones - the cost of running a twisted pair of copper wire to remote areas was prohibitive.
 

steve149

Veni, Vidi, Lusi
Staff member
Sep 26, 2011
32,436
Prospect, CT
It's not just age. We, who live in the Industrial World, have a distorted view of things. I remember a Y2K statistic that was being kicked around - as of the year 2000,
one half the world's population had never even made a phone call ! I'm sure that number has lowered in the last 18 years due to cell phones - the cost of running a twisted pair of copper wire to remote areas was prohibitive.
One of the reasons the Googles and the Amazons (et al) were looking at area wifi via blimps for a lot of locations.
 

Big Dan

Administrator
Staff member
Jul 20, 2006
5,643
34
New York
danhutter.com
*Everything* is funneled into a subscription model now. It's ridiculous. Those seemingly cheap $4.99 and $9.99 subscriptions add up over the course of a month. I was looking to license a few stock photos for a client's site. One site's model was $29/image or $30/mo with 10 'free' images per month. Subscribing for a month sounds like a good idea until your forget to cancel or the cancellation process is as convoluted as AOL back in the day.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
3,282
I was in line at the post office today. Post office was very busy with everyone mailing stuff out for holidays. The lady in front of me and I carried out a small conversation. I mentioned that I did most of my holiday shopping online, and waited in very few lines this year. This one at the post office was the longest one so far. She said she does not do anything online. She doesn't own a computer, and does not even own a cell phone! She is 84 years old, and she said "When you get over 80, none of the new stuff matters any more!"

...The downside for her imo though, is that she has probably spent a lot of time waiting in lines to do her Christmas shopping over the last 5 years. Perhaps she does not mind it, but being her age, I know that standing for long amounts of time, and walking in and out of large stores must take a toll on her body.

My point is that older people tend to stick with what they have known, and "if it still works, why change it" ...This point can be a good one, but it can also be a bad one without realizing it.
There's no negative in that for her. Doing things online means she'll be alone and isolated at home when she could be out standing in line and having conversations with people like you. At 84 being present with other people is not that easy and if she can get out and stand in line - all the power to her!
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
3,282
It seems to me that the internet has become the transit for nearly everything - and I don't think that is what it was built for. It's card stacked on what was computer networks and now we expect it to carry every bit of detail in our lives from auto-driving our car to telling us how much mayonaise is left in the fridge.

Given there's no Plan B for this conduct - what happens when the internet gets broken? Surely there is something out there lurking that at one point or another is going to wreak havoc with a social and civil order that is totally dependent on it's WiFi and WAN.
 

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
3,826
36
It seems to me that the internet has become the transit for nearly everything - and I don't think that is what it was built for. It's card stacked on what was computer networks and now we expect it to carry every bit of detail in our lives from auto-driving our car to telling us how much mayonaise is left in the fridge.

Given there's no Plan B for this conduct - what happens when the internet gets broken? Surely there is something out there lurking that at one point or another is going to wreak havoc with a social and civil order that is totally dependent on it's WiFi and WAN.
For starter's If the internet becomes broken, and is not fixed within 24 hours or so, lots of companies will find their stocks plummeting rather quickly. If the internet is broken for a extended period of time, I expect massive layoffs would occur for many companies like Amazon, Tiger Direct, Ebay.

Lots of bills will go unpaid for a long period of time because most people have switched to paying bills online. Many people don't carry checks any more. I have no desire to order more checks once the business checks are all used up. My brother switched to being paid via PayPal, so I don't write a check for him any longer. All of my business expenses are via credit card now. ...

Also, lots of teenagers, and young adults would go nuts for at least a week before they start to get on with their lives. Kinds would be forced to go outside and play again. Many people won't know answers to many questions because they can't ask google.

Information would be very limited, and news would be limited as well. We would have to go back to relying on what they tell us on TV and Radio for news again. News Paper sales might pick back up!

Hard back books would come into play again. If the internet broke, it would be like 1995/1996 again, just that we have way more advanced video games, and phones have cameras now.

Music would have to go back to selling on CD. A lot of revenue streams would be seriously interrupted for many people across the world.
 

ittigger

Hundred Acre Industry Icon
Feb 1, 2011
12,911
Western Maryland
If the Internet is broken, you will not find the stock market plummeting. We have already seen instances where an ISP has experienced outages for several days - and nothing negative came of it, economy, stocks, ISP or otherwise. What you will see is a rapid attempt to find the cause and then fix and respond to the cause of the breakage. If the cause is a foreign actor, you can expect a response. If the cause is faulty equipment, then the stocks of said provider may get a slight hit - but no one else would be affected. It would take something extremely severe to knock out the Internet completely. In any case, the 'Internet' (interconnected networks) has a failsafe. Your home may not, but the Internet does.

In the event of something extreme, like a nuclear attack (which is also not capable of knocking out the Internet), you will have much more to worry about than if the Internet is working or not.
 
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Scott Hanna

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 25, 2006
5,985
52
Cleveland, OH
www.djincleveland.com
I think they are just a company trying to make more money. Imagine that.

I think it's going to be a hard sell.

Subscription based software works on expensive software like Photoshop or office. But to take a software that was pretty inexpensive before and make it much more will be tough. I think I paid $10 or $20 for the djay app I have
 

DJ Ricky B

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 9, 2015
3,826
36
If the Internet is broken, you will not find the stock market plummeting. We have already seen instances where an ISP has experienced outages for several days - and nothing negative came of it, economy, stocks, ISP or otherwise. What you will see is a rapid attempt to find the cause and then fix and respond to the cause of the breakage. If the cause is a foreign actor, you can expect a response. If the cause is faulty equipment, then the stocks of said provider may get a slight hit - but no one else would be affected. It would take something extremely severe to knock out the Internet completely. In any case, the 'Internet' (interconnected networks) has a failsafe. Your home may not, but the Internet does.

In the event of something extreme, like a nuclear attack (which is also not capable of knocking out the Internet), you will have much more to worry about than if the Internet is working or not.
If SkyNet becomes Self Aware, the Internet can exist without control of humans. Humans likely won't have control over anything at that point :)