Corded mic Question

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
1,119
60
You said a mixer. It's a mixing board you're using. There is a difference. You should be able to use Quarter inch on one side so long as it's input and not output it's hooked into. Do you have a controller? If you do you can use the mic input on that to use the mic.

I like to use a cordless and corded mic. The corded mic I like to keep by me . That way I don't have to chase after a cordless microphone. Also it can be backup just in case something happens to the cordless microphone..
 

steve149

Veni, Vidi, Lusi
Staff member
Sep 26, 2011
32,427
Prospect, CT
You said a mixer. It's a mixing board you're using. There is a difference. You should be able to use Quarter inch on one side so long as it's input and not output it's hooked into. Do you have a controller? If you do you can use the mic input on that to use the mic.

I like to use a cordless and corded mic. The corded mic I like to keep by me . That way I don't have to chase after a cordless microphone. Also it can be backup just in case something happens to the cordless microphone..
1/4" inputs should NOT be used by a corded mic. 1/4" inputs typically (there are some rare exceptions like mic 2 on the Denon MC6000) are "line level" inputs, not mic level. They might be used for a cordless mic or an external mic mixer, but the OP use was for a corded mic.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
3,282
An unbalanced mic input is always a 1/4" TS jack, commonly found on DJ, karaoke, and consumer gear, or prosumer mic/line mixers.

That doesn't mean that every 1/4" TS jack is meant for a microphone. Just read the damn labels! :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: azdeejay

MIXMASTERMACHOM

DJ Extraordinaire
Oct 16, 2011
1,119
60
1/4" inputs should NOT be used by a corded mic. 1/4" inputs typically (there are some rare exceptions like mic 2 on the Denon MC6000) are "line level" inputs, not mic level. They might be used for a cordless mic or an external mic mixer, but the OP use was for a corded mic.
He can use an XLR cable to hook into the mixing board. That would do it. One end hooks into the mic and the other end goes into the mixing board.
 

steve149

Veni, Vidi, Lusi
Staff member
Sep 26, 2011
32,427
Prospect, CT
He can use an XLR cable to hook into the mixing board. That would do it. One end hooks into the mic and the other end goes into the mixing board.
Yes, but his cable was 1/4" on the mixer side.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ittigger

steve149

Veni, Vidi, Lusi
Staff member
Sep 26, 2011
32,427
Prospect, CT
An unbalanced mic input is always a 1/4" TS jack, commonly found on DJ, karaoke, and consumer gear, or prosumer mic/line mixers.

That doesn't mean that every 1/4" TS jack is meant for a microphone. Just read the damn labels! :)
And the corollary, not every 1/4" mic jack is unbalanced (the mic 2 input on the MC6000 is 1/4" balanced). Unfortunately, some just label a 1/4" jack "mic" .. you need to find the specs to see if it is TRS balanced or TS unbalanced. It would be nice if the standard said it needed to be labeled correctly.
 

BlueLineDJ

DJ Extraordinaire
Jan 25, 2015
801
I love all the input and guidance from everyone, especially the few that either don't. read the OP or have no business answering in the first place.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
3,282
And the corollary, not every 1/4" mic jack is unbalanced (the mic 2 input on the MC6000 is 1/4" balanced). Unfortunately, some just label a 1/4" jack "mic" .. you need to find the specs to see if it is TRS balanced or TS unbalanced. It would be nice if the standard said it needed to be labeled correctly.
I would not adopt this corollary because it's a non-standard practice that produces a lot of errors. The limited amount of space for input jacks on an MC6000 is probably why they use a TRS input for mic. It not only requires the insertion of a jumper cable or adapter with balanced mics but, there's more serious error potential if phantom power is sent where it doesn't belong.
 

steve149

Veni, Vidi, Lusi
Staff member
Sep 26, 2011
32,427
Prospect, CT
I would not adopt this corollary because it's a non-standard practice that produces a lot of errors. The limited amount of space for input jacks on an MC6000 is probably why they use a TRS input for mic. It not only requires the insertion of a jumper cable or adapter with balanced mics but, there's more serious error potential if phantom power is sent where it doesn't belong.
Generally the 1/4" mic inputs don't offer phantom power (same for the 1/4" portion of a combo jack), though it could certainly work if one only used TRS plugs. Because you CAN plug in a TS plug they generally don't. But the Denon isn't the only one to have 1/4" balanced inputs (and many have 1/4" balanced outputs - as you said, because of space) .. Pioneer DDJSX3 has one in front (though marked balanced, DDJSR2 has one (unlabeled) in back .. etc. Very common for the 2nd mic input on controllers.
 

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
3,282
The simple fact of the matter is that the Peavey PV-6 mixer does not have a 1/4" Hi-Z mic or instrument input which is required to use the kind of mic cable described by the OP.

If instead his mixer is the Peavey PV-6 BT then the channel 1 input is a combo jack that will accept any of the following: a balanced XLR,1/4" TRS, or a Hi-Z unbalanced 1/4" TS plug. His problem may be a mismatch of impedance because a 1/4" wired Hi-Z dynamic mic will not properly drive anything other than the HI-Z input.

Because the OP has not identified the mic being used - the issue may be further complicated by a Low-Z mic intended for balanced connection. In that case - the most ionformative post would be that made by Mix: which advised him to use an XLR-XLR cable.
 

steve149

Veni, Vidi, Lusi
Staff member
Sep 26, 2011
32,427
Prospect, CT
The simple fact of the matter is that the Peavey PV-6 mixer does not have a 1/4" Hi-Z mic or instrument input which is required to use the kind of mic cable described by the OP.

If instead his mixer is the Peavey PV-6 BT then the channel 1 input is a combo jack that will accept any of the following: a balanced XLR,1/4" TRS, or a Hi-Z unbalanced 1/4" TS plug. His problem may be a mismatch of impedance because a 1/4" wired Hi-Z dynamic mic will not properly drive anything other than the HI-Z input.

Because the OP has not identified the mic being used - the issue may be further complicated by a Low-Z mic intended for balanced connection. In that case - the most ionformative post would be that made by Mix: which advised him to use an XLR-XLR cable.
Correct on the cable .. so the options are change the cable to an XLR-XLR one, use a TRS to XLR adapter, change the mixer to one that allows a balanced 1/4" mic, or change the mic if it truly is unbalanced(there was no indication of that.
 

wifedj

DJ Extraordinaire
Mar 20, 2008
1,154
Correct on the cable .. so the options are change the cable to an XLR-XLR one, use a TRS to XLR adapter, change the mixer to one that allows a balanced 1/4" mic, or change the mic if it truly is unbalanced(there was no indication of that.
Don't forget the most obvious option, search pawn shops and Craig's list for a used Vintage Telefunken U47 Tube Microphone then make it work on an also used Realistic mixer, VIOLA!
 
Last edited:

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
3,282
What microphone (model) the OP is trying to use matters more than what mixer he wants to pug it onto. A 30 year old Prologue for example, won't work without a transformer or custom wired cable but, it looks just like any other SM58 or PG48.