Can anybody give a review on Shure BLX 288 wireless microphones?

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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
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4,920
Let me tell the real truth. The mics were having issues. When I was driving home I realized what was wrong. The mics weren't the problem. The problem was he was playing music real loud. He was blasting the music and the people using the mics were no more than 4-5 feet away from the speakers. So the mics picked up the blasting music. It was too loud for the people using the mics that close. I didn't say anything because it was his his gig.
Why are your mics at someone else's gig?

PS: Can you get me a 4K camera for a gig next week?
 

Jeff Romard

Administrator
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Sep 4, 2006
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Sydney, Nova Scotia
Let me tell the real truth. The mics were having issues. When I was driving home I realized what was wrong. The mics weren't the problem. The problem was he was playing music real loud. He was blasting the music and the people using the mics were no more than 4-5 feet away from the speakers. So the mics picked up the blasting music. It was too loud for the people using the mics that close. I didn't say anything because it was his his gig.
I don't recall you saying about problems previously. Was it feeding back?

Feed back my man
Get a good 31 band eq
I might add and a compressor/limiter but before he does any of that learn how to use them or it will get considerably worse
 

TES3S

DJ Extraordinaire
Sep 18, 2016
500
311
Los Angeles, CA
BLX is a joke, well compared to QLXD/ULXD.

I bought one for a cheap backup and when I tested it, granted I am in LA (one of the most crowded RF areas), it couldn't hold a signal more than 50 ft. I then hooked back my QLXD and could go around 400 feet.

Sold the BLX the next day. They have models below the QLXD like the new SLXD but it's not all that great either.

I now own ALL QLXD (10 of them) and have not had a dropout in 6 years (when I used SLX and PGX).

I use them for everything, and at almost every gig, I run at least one wireless speaker for fill, but also run my mains wirelessly when needed. That's how much I trust these things. They are super solid and reliable.

I have gotten close to 6oo feet with paddle antennas too, but never need to run those as the 1/2 antennas work pretty well.

I also like that I never have to buy batteries again as I use the rechargeable Shure Lithium batteries with true readout time, by the minute.
 
Last edited:

Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,519
4,920
BLX is a joke, well compared to QLXD/ULXD.
The joke is any attempt to compare the two. Blame doesn't accrue to the mic when people use it outside of it's intended design. (A widespread habit of DJs.)

A complete BLX system (Rvcr+HH) is $299 while the the same QLXD configuration will cost over $1,000. There's an obvious reason for that and making a mic "affordable" comes with expected limitations. (The average cell phone costs two or three times as much as a BLX mic.)

The BLX is an analog system with a recommended range of 60ft in clear line of sight using a passive internal 1/4 wave antenna. They are intended for dance or exercise instructors, DJs, and casual musicians who are likely to be using the transmitter in close proximity to the receiver.

The QLXD is a DIGITAL system using 1/2 wave passive antennas or active directional antenna systems (AMPLIFIED up to +12db) with remote placement that provides virtually unlimited range within a well planned system or venue.. They are network ready and Dante accessible. You can directly access a QLXD mic from across town, across the country, or around the world.
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,519
4,920
I might add a compressor/limiter but before he does any of that learn how to use them or it will get considerably worse
The target customer for a BLX microphone is not someone who would not understand processing. The whole point of the BLX is attaching it to very simple PA systems like you find in dance studios, school music rooms, exercise class, etc. . It's supposed to be for people who don't do audio, and has a form factor that fits easily in your gym bag. (Hence, the internal antenna.)

It's unusual for a mobile DJ to be using a mixer that has a mic processor loop. Adding a 31 band EQ, compression etc. to the main mix to compensate for improper mic habits will just cause more problems. I think if people want to run around in front of the speakers with their mic then they need to start by learning and building an audio system that provides for that ability. We can't just plunk down $300 and expect to get a "magic" mic.
 

TES3S

DJ Extraordinaire
Sep 18, 2016
500
311
Los Angeles, CA
The joke is any attempt to compare the two. Blame doesn't accrue to the mic when people use it outside of it's intended design. (A widespread habit of DJs.)

A complete BLX system (Rvcr+HH) is $299 while the the same QLXD configuration will cost over $1,000. There's an obvious reason for that and making a mic "affordable" comes with expected limitations. (The average cell phone costs two or three times as much as a BLX mic.)

The BLX is an analog system with a recommended range of 60ft in clear line of sight using a passive internal 1/4 wave antenna. They are intended for dance or exercise instructors, DJs, and casual musicians who are likely to be using the transmitter in close proximity to the receiver.

The QLXD is a DIGITAL system using 1/2 wave passive antennas or active directional antenna systems (AMPLIFIED up to +12db) with remote placement that provides virtually unlimited range within a well planned system or venue.. They are network ready and Dante accessible. You can directly access a QLXD mic from across town, across the country, or around the world.
Agreed, I also got it for $50, and sold it for more. The Shure SLX which also used 1/2 wave antennas also performs nowhere as well as the QLXD. Surprisingly, the PSM IEM300 system from Shure is also crap. Could barely get 50 feet. I now just stick to QLXD and ULXD for ALL wireless needs including point to point for wireless speakers. Don't use it much, but the free software is nice for multiple units as you can scan and deploy multiple units at the same time. Pretty neat!
 
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Proformance

DJ Extraordinaire
Nov 6, 2006
7,519
4,920
For receivers with attached 1/4 wave antennas it matters a great deal where you put the receiver and how it's oriented relative to the mic.

It's also possible to be using the WRONG antennas.1/2 wave antennas are color coded and specific to a given frequency band. They frequently get mixed up and put with the wrong receiver. If buying used gear it's important to know that all the parts are properly matched.